National

U.S.
3:46 am
Wed March 6, 2013

With Adaptive Skiing, Disabled People No Longer Left Out In The Cold

Tilghman Logan and his instructor, Craig Stagg, do some practice turns using sit skis. Some ski resorts have created opportunities for people with disabilities to participate in snow sports.
Carrie Jung KUNM

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 11:18 am

March means spring break is just around the corner, and for New Mexico it means mild temperatures and fresh snow — perfect conditions for visiting area ski resorts.

A growing number of resorts are now offering programs that cater to vacationers with disabilities, and resort owners say it has proved to be a boost for business.

At a Taos Ski Valley chairlift, Barbara and Philip Logan prepare their son, Tilghman, for his first day of ski lessons.

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Working Late: Older Americans On The Job
3:42 am
Wed March 6, 2013

For Midwife, 71, Delivering Babies Never Gets Old

Colorado midwife Dian Sparling, 71, meets with Lisa Eldridge and her baby, Colton James.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 2:30 pm

Increasingly, people are continuing to work past 65. Almost a third of Americans between the ages of 65 and 70 are working, and among those older than 75, about 7 percent are still on the job. In Working Late, a series for Morning Edition, NPR profiles older adults who are still in the workforce.

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The Two-Way
6:40 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Judge Intervenes In Heated Battle Over Alabama's Education Bill

Circuit Court Judge Charles Price hears arguments in in Montgomery, Ala., Tuesday on a bill that provides private school tax credits. The judge halted the bill from being delivered to the governor.
Dave Martin AP

A judge in Alabama has blocked the state's governor from signing a school choice bill, after a lawsuit alleged that lawmakers bypassed state rules when they substantially revised the legislation in committee. The vote to pass the bill last week was marked by confusion, anger, and accusations of "sleaziness" and "hypocrisy," as AL.com reported.

Here was the scene last week, as the bill's backers sought to end debate and hold a vote:

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Around the Nation
5:45 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Born In Sierra Leone, Young Woman Documents Her Final Steps On Path To Citizenship

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 6:20 pm

Becoming a citizen was a long path for Veralyn Williams. She came to the U.S. from Africa as an infant, and found as a teen, she couldn't even get a job at a fast food restaurant. This is the final chapter in her journey to citizenship.

Politics
5:45 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Jeb Bush May Have Changed His Mind On Immigration With 2016 Bid In Sight

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 6:20 pm

When former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush got to work on his new book on immigration, he was expected to be out in front of his party urging a broader conversation with Hispanics and more open legislation. After all, he had previously supported a pathway to citizenship for immigrants here illegally. Instead, it's fellow Florida Republican Marco Rubio in the lead, and Bush who's explaining an apparent reversal on the issue of citizenship. Both are likely candidates for president in 2016.

U.S.
5:45 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Dow Jones Industrial Average Soars On Positive Economic News

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 6:20 pm

The Dow Jones Industrial Average crossed over into record territory Tuesday morning and kept going. At midday it was up nearly 150 points and well over its previous high of 14,164, set in October of 2007. The composition of the Dow has changed a lot since then.

Health
5:45 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

To Combat 'Superbugs,' Hospitals Boost Disinfection Techniques

With the rise in superbug occurrences at hospitals, Audie Cornish talks with Tara Palmore, deputy hospital epidemiologist and infectious disease physician at the National Institutes of Health, about how healthcare facilities are changing practices to help stem the spread of the drug-resistant bacteria.

The Two-Way
5:02 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

At 106, Man Finally Gets An Elusive High School Diploma

Fred Butler has done many things in his 106 years, from serving in two military theaters of World War II to helping raise five children. But he had never gone to high school, or earned a diploma — the result of leaving school after the eighth grade to work full-time in a print shop to help support his family.

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The Two-Way
3:38 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Green Jacket Auction Halted After Augusta National Asserts Ownership

Augusta National says it has long maintained ownership of the green jackets it awards the winners of the Masters Tournament. Here, Bubba Watson accepts his jacket after winning last year's event.
Streeter Lecka Getty Images

The Masters Tournament is still a month away, but the green jackets that grace the winners' shoulders are already in the news, thanks to a lawsuit over a proposed auction of a former champion's jacket.

On one side is tournament host Augusta National Golf Club, which says the jacket, won by Art Wall Jr. in 1959, was stolen; on the other is Florida doctor Stephen Pyles and Heritage Auctions of Texas, who insist the jacket was obtained legally and can thus be sold to the highest bidder.

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Around the Nation
3:20 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Sequestered Spring Means Fewer Rangers, Services At National Parks

Hikers walk on the Mist Trail to Vernal Fall at Yosemite National Park in California. The National Park Service has to cut $134 million from sites around the country, including Yosemite, due to the lack of a budget deal in Congress.
Gosia Wozniacka AP

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 11:49 am

Spring has come early to the Yosemite Valley, and the melting snow makes for a spectacular rush of water off the granite face of Yosemite Falls, the tallest in North America.

Early March is when park officials would normally be gearing up for the busy tourist season. Instead, they're figuring out how to cut $1.5 million from their budget. Without a budget deal, the sequestration has forced the Park Service to cut a total of $134 million from sites around the country.

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The Salt
3:11 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Who Grew Your Pint? How Craft Brews Boost Local Farmers

Throwback Brewery in New Hampshire is one of almost 20 New England breweries using malts from Massachusetts' micro-malt house Vally Malt.
Courtesy of Throwback Brewery

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 5:27 pm

Brent Manning is a maltster on a mission. The co-founder of Riverbend Malt House in Asheville, N.C., wants people to be able to taste local grains in North Carolina's beers, just as vino aficionados can identify the provenance of fine wines.

"In the wine industry ... they will tell you that the No. 1 Syrah grape grows on this hillside over here because it's a bit rockier," Manning explains. "It's that very same connection to the soil and the underlying geology that creates these nuances in flavors."

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Shots - Health News
3:00 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Infections With 'Nightmare Bacteria' Are On The Rise In U.S. Hospitals

Klebsiella pneumoniae, seen here with an electron microscope, are the most common superbugs causing highly drug-resistant infections in hospitals.
Kwangshin Kim Science Source

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 4:34 pm

Federal officials warned Tuesday that an especially dangerous group of superbugs has become a significant health problem in hospitals throughout the United States.

These germs, known as carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, have become much more common in the last decade, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And the risk they pose to health is becoming evident.

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Governing
1:44 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Old Triumph Over Young In Federal Spending, And Sequester Makes It Worse

Federal spending on seniors already far outpaces that devoted to children. Last year, overall spending on children dropped for the first time in 30 years. The sequester, which expressly protects programs for the elderly, will exacerbate that difference.
Anne de Haas iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 5:23 pm

For years, federal programs for seniors and those that help kids have been on a collision course.

Now, given the automatic spending cuts taking place under sequestration, the moment for real competition may have arrived.

While Medicare and Social Security will come through the sequester mostly unscathed, a broad swath of programs targeted toward children — Head Start, education, nutrition assistance, child welfare — stand to lose hundreds of millions or even billions of dollars.

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Health
1:42 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

What A Mississippi Baby Can Tell HIV Researchers

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 2:53 pm

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Now this week, doctors announced a breakthrough in HIV research. A Mississippi toddler who was born with the virus appears to have been cured. Doctors credit an aggressive regimen of anti-retroviral drugs administered just after the girl was born. This is the second well-documented case of someone being cured. The other involved a middle-aged San Francisco man who received a bone marrow transplant from a donor who was genetically resistant to HIV.

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Sports
1:42 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

A Shifting Tide For Gay Athletes In Professional Sports?

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 8:45 am

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Ari Shapiro, in Washington. Neal Conan is away. Last week, two pro football players asked the Supreme Court to support same-sex marriage. It was an unusual moment for the NFL. Not long ago, nobody in pro sports talked publicly about sexual orientation, and now the issue seems to be everywhere.

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