National

It's All Politics
9:03 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Lonely And Frustrated: These May Be The Worst Jobs In Politics

Democrats have dominated Rhode Island's Capitol building in Providence for decades. One state Republican says it's an "uphill battle" to sell voters and candidates on the GOP's message.
Myles Dumas iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 2:56 pm

Politics is filled with thankless jobs.

It's the nature of the business that plenty of people have to work for highly demanding egomaniacs. Among elected officials, few relish having to spend big chunks of their time asking other people for money, one of the essential chores.

There are certain jobs, however, that appear from the outside to be so hopeless that you wonder why anyone agreed to take them on.

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The Two-Way
8:35 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Broader Justification Emerges Of When U.S. Can Kill Americans Who Join Al-Qaida

October 2011: Men stand on the rubble of a building destroyed by a U.S. drone strike in southeastern Yemen. Among those killed was U.S. citizen Abdulrahman al-Awlaki, the son of U.S.-born cleric Anwar al-Awlaki — who himself was killed by a drone strike the month before.
Khaled Abdullah Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 12:57 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': Carrie Johnson talks with Steve Inskeep

American citizens who become leaders in al-Qaida or other terrorist organizations overseas and pose "an imminent threat" to Americans may be killed with drone strikes even when there's no evidence that they have specific plans to attack Americans or U.S. interests, according to a Justice Department memo that surfaced Monday.

NPR's Carrie Johnson tells our Newscast Desk that:

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Around the Nation
7:53 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Tuba Players Take Valentine's Day Requests

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 1:47 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montage. As one considers the many ways of wooing a beloved on Valentine's Day, the ungainly tuba and its deep bass sound are not the most obviously romantic. Still, a dozen tuba players at the University of Memphis in cute red vests and bow ties are offering a tuba serenade that will at least bring smiles. Their fee includes chocolates, a card, and two classic tunes like "My Girl" and "My Guy."

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

(humming)

The Two-Way
7:41 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Dramatic End To Alabama Hostage Standoff Took Careful Planning

Law enforcement officials, including some from the FBI, near the scene of the hostage situation in Midland City, Ala., on Friday.
Philip Sears Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 9:29 pm

  • From the NPR Newscast: Dan Carsen reports

(We updated the top of this post with new material at 9:50 a.m. ET.)

As more becomes known about how authorities on Monday rescued an almost-6-year-old boy named Ethan from his nearly week-long captivity in an Alabama bunker with a gunman, some fascinating details are emerging.

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Business
6:54 am
Tue February 5, 2013

FCC Proposes Public WiFi Network

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 1:47 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The federal government has proposed an ambitious plan to build public WiFi networks throughout the country. The idea is to boost innovation and make the Internet cheaper and more accessible.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The Federal Communications Commission wants to do this by acquiring wireless spectrum from television broadcasters, including certain airwaves and set them aside for public use.

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Business
6:26 am
Tue February 5, 2013

S&P To Face Fraud Suit Over Mortgage-Backed Securities

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 1:47 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The U.S. Justice Department plans to file a civil suit this week accusing the credit rating company Standard and Poor's of fraud. Standard and Poor's is the company that famously downgraded U.S. debt in 2011. This investigation focuses on S and P's actions before the financial crisis. The civil action accuses S and P of fraudulently inflating the ratings of mortgage investments, setting them up for the crash that lead to the great recession. The investigation is the focus of today's Business Bottom Line, and here's NPR's Jim Zarroli.

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NPR Story
6:10 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Texas Court Of Inquiry To Decide If Prosecutor Lied

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 1:47 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

In Texas, a court of inquiry has been convened to consider prosecuting a Texas judge. He's Ken Anderson. He used to be the district attorney in Williamson County, Texas, and he could face criminal charges for concealing exculpatory evidence. That's evidence that could clear a defendant of guilt. The inquiry concerns his conduct during what has become an infamous case - the prosecution and conviction of Michael Morton. Morton was wrongfully convicted and sentenced to life in prison for murdering his wife. NPR's Wade Goodwin reports.

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NPR Story
5:56 am
Tue February 5, 2013

In Minn., Obama Appeals For Movement On Gun Background Checks

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 1:47 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, on the same as that funeral, President Obama continued his push for tougher gun laws. He was talking yesterday in Minneapolis on a subject he is expected to address in next week's State of the Union speech.

NPR's David Welna reports.

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Health
3:24 am
Tue February 5, 2013

FMLA Not Really Working For Many Employees

Jeannine Sato holds her 2-year-old son, Keni; 5-year-old Hana is held by her father, Mas Sato. Jeannine decided to leave her job when her employers said she could take six weeks off after giving birth to her first child or risk losing her job.
Courtesy of Jeannine Sato

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 1:47 pm

Twenty years after President Bill Clinton signed the Family and Medical Leave Act, workers' rights groups say many employees still must choose between their family or their job.

They're marking the anniversary with calls to expand the law, and for Congress to pass a new one that would provide paid leave.

What Falls Under The FMLA?

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Around the Nation
3:07 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Gun Violence Robs Chicago Mother Of 4th Child

Shirley Chambers cries during Monday's funeral for her son Ronnie Chambers, 33. She had four children, three boys and a girl, all victims of gun violence in Chicago over a period of 18 years.
John Gress Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 3:40 pm

The gun violence that scars some Chicago neighborhoods has been a plague for one woman. Shirley Chambers first lost a child to gunfire in the mid 1990s. In 2000, a daughter and a son were shot to death just months apart. On Monday, Chambers buried her last child.

Nearly 500 people filled the pews, the choir lofts and hallways of St. Luke Church of God in Christ for the funeral of 33-year-old Ronnie Chambers, an aspiring music producer who died Jan. 26.

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Around the Nation
6:10 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Gun Control Divides County Sheriffs

President Obama and law enforcement officials meet in January to discuss gun violence. To the left of Obama is Hennepin County, Minn., Sheriff Richard W. Stanek; to the right is Charles H. Ramsey, commissioner of the Philadelphia Police Department.
Rex Features AP

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 10:29 am

When President Obama announced new measures to prevent gun violence, one of the groups there to show support was the National Sheriffs' Association. The group represents more than 3,000 county sheriffs across the country.

But not all sheriffs agree with the group's support for what it calls "common-sense steps," like a universal background check for all gun purchasers.

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Law
5:55 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Stolen California Petroglyphs Returned, But Many Questions Remain

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 10:29 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Well, now to the publishing past, the very ancient past. In California last fall, a set of petroglyphs was stolen from a sacred Native American site. They were brazenly sawed and chiseled out of the face of a rock formation. The petroglyphs are believed to be more than 3,000 years old. And now, they've been found. Still, authorities don't know who took them or why. Here's NPR's Kirk Siegler reporting from Bishop, California.

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Law
5:55 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Chicago Police Superintendent: Gun Laws Play Huge Role In Lowering Gun Deaths

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 10:29 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Around the Nation
5:55 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

New Jersey Shore Could Still See A Summer Packed With Profits After Sandy

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 10:29 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Today, is a big day for many people in Ortley Beach, New Jersey. Those with utilities were allowed to move back into their homes full-time this morning. It's the first time since Hurricane Sandy hit more than three months ago. New Jersey takes in an estimated $37 billion in tourism and shore towns are racing to rebuild by the start of the summer season.

The ones that are ready could see a sunnier-than-usual tourist season packed with profits. From member station WNYC, Janet Babin reports.

KATHY CIVOLI: Where can my shed be?

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Politics
5:55 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Obama: Lawmakers Must Feel Like They Have To Act Against Gun Violence

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 10:29 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

President Obama took his case today for revamping the nation's gun laws to the frozen streets of Minneapolis, in the first of what will likely be a series of similar events in the coming weeks. The president urged voters to turn up the pressure on Congress and take action to curb gun violence. NPR's David Welna has our story from Minneapolis.

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