National

Sports
6:15 am
Mon September 3, 2012

Baseball's Small Market Teams Win Big

Originally published on Mon September 3, 2012 9:29 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The Oakland A's, with one of the smallest payrolls in Major League Baseball, faced the big-spending Boston Red Sox on Sunday with hopes of capturing their ninth straight victory. And as you can hear from KGMZ radio in San Francisco, the A's won 6-2.

(SOUNDBITE OF KGMZ BROADCAST)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Lavarnway way strikes out. And the A's have swept the Red Sox at the Coliseum for the second time this year.

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Around the Nation
4:03 am
Mon September 3, 2012

Fears About Shariah Law Take Hold In Tennessee

Originally published on Mon September 3, 2012 8:53 am

It's getting tougher to be a Republican in some parts of the country while also fully accepting the practice of Islam.

In Tennessee, an incumbent in the U.S. House found herself on the defensive after being called soft on Shariah law, the code that guides Muslim beliefs and actions. And the state's governor has been forced to explain why he hired a Muslim.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:02 am
Mon September 3, 2012

Can We Learn To Forget Our Memories?

Research shows that under certain circumstances, we can train ourselves to forget details about particular memories.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 3, 2012 7:06 pm

Around 10 years ago, Malcolm MacLeod got interested in forgetting.

For most people, the tendency to forget is something we spend our time cursing. Where are my keys? What am I looking for in the refrigerator again? What is that woman's name?

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Dead Stop
3:58 am
Mon September 3, 2012

A Resting Place For Hunting Hounds In Alabama

Franky Hatton and Cletis pose in front of the gravestones of Hatton's champion coon hounds at Coon Dog Cemetery near Cherokee, Ala.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Mon September 3, 2012 6:15 am

Seventy-five years ago, Key Underwood and his raccoon-hunting dog Troop had a connection. Years of training and a deep relationship make human and canine a seamless hunting unit. The two can share a special bond.

So when old Troop died, Underwood buried him on the crest of a hill hidden away in the lush countryside near Cherokee, Ala. It was Underwood's favorite hunting spot. He marked the grave with an old chimney stone he chiseled with a hammer and screwdriver.

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NPR Story
3:57 am
Mon September 3, 2012

Once Denied A Purple Heart, A Soldier Gets Her Medal

Retired Army Major Michelle Dyarman holds the Purple Heart medal she was awarded after suffering a severe concussion from an IED in Baghdad in 2005.
Robb Hill for NPR

Originally published on Mon September 3, 2012 9:11 am

In 2010, NPR reported that some Army commanders refused to award the Purple Heart to many troops who got concussions in combat because they didn't consider these "real" injuries. As a result of our story, the Army did its own investigation and put out new guidelines on Purple Hearts. Last week, the Army told NPR that under the new rules, they've finally awarded the medal to almost 1,000 soldiers, including Michelle Dyarman, whom we profiled in our original 2010 reports.

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Sports
5:03 pm
Sun September 2, 2012

Defensive Back Struggles to Hold a Job

New England Patriots safety Ross Ventrone catches a pass before an an NFL game against the New York Jets and on Nov. 13, 2011, in East Rutherford, N.J.
Bill Kostroun AP

Originally published on Sun September 2, 2012 6:57 pm

Ross Ventrone has been hired, promoted, or fired by the New England Patriots no fewer than 29 times in two years. The transition the defensive back from Villanova made into the world of professional football has been different from what most people would assume, he tells Guy Raz, host of weekends of All Things Considered.

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Interviews
5:03 pm
Sun September 2, 2012

New Teen Buzzwod: Yolo

Originally published on Sun September 2, 2012 6:57 pm

Transcript

ROSS VENTRONE: OK. If you're under 25 and you're listening, for those of us who aren't, we're about to discuss some vocabulary The Boston Globe language columnist Ben Zimmer says you already know. Ben Zimmer, let's do this thing. Yolo.

BEN ZIMMER: Yolo.

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Yolo. It's an acronym that stands for you only live once, and Ben Zimmer says it's the buzzword of the year for teenagers and young adults.

ZIMMER: Especially after a song, "The Motto," by the rapper Drake came out.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THE MOTTO")

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Around the Nation
6:24 am
Sun September 2, 2012

Isaac Aftermath: Did New Orleans Pass The Test?

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Around the Nation
6:24 am
Sun September 2, 2012

From A Single Charter School, A Movement Grows

Originally published on Sun September 2, 2012 6:02 pm

City Academy in St. Paul, Minn., became the nation's first publicly funded, privately run charter school when it opened its doors in 1992. Its founders, all veteran public school teachers, had tried but failed to create new programs for struggling students in their own schools.

The school helped launch a movement that has since grown to 5,600 charter schools across the U.S. But back in the late 1980s, it faced strong resistance.

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Around the Nation
5:04 pm
Sat September 1, 2012

Buffalo Cleans Up From Dirty Industrial Past

City leaders are attempting to increase public access to Buffalo's waterways, long blocked by aging industrial ruins and polluted land.
Daniel Robison for NPR

Originally published on Sat September 1, 2012 6:37 pm

Along the shore of Lake Erie, the rusting relics of Buffalo, N.Y.'s industrial days have long blocked access to the water and posed risks to residents. Now, after decades of inaction, the city is finally clearing a path for the public to return to the waterfront.

Buffalo's approach has been dubbed "lighter, faster, cheaper." Tom Dee has led this effort as president of the Erie Canal Harbor Development Corp., a special state agency in charge of city waterfront property. He says years were wasted chasing grand redevelopment projects, but now the strategy is more homegrown.

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Movie Interviews
5:03 pm
Sat September 1, 2012

Right-Wing Filmmaker: Obama's An Anti-Colonialist

Movie poster for 2016: Obama's America.
Rocky Mountain Pictures

Originally published on Sat September 1, 2012 6:37 pm

  • Host Guy Raz Talks To '2016: Obama's America' Filmmaker Dinesh D'Souza

In mid-July, an obscure film called 2016: Obama's America opened in just one theater in Houston. The film proposes that President Obama is weakening the country — deliberately.

Conservative writer Dinesh D'Souza, its co-director and star, traveled to Hawaii, Indonesia and Kenya to test that theory, and this week, his film could be seen at 1,500 theaters across America.

Many critics have blasted the conspiratorial tone of the film, which D'Souza calls a documentary.

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The Two-Way
4:02 pm
Sat September 1, 2012

'Jonathan Livingston Seagull' Author Richard Bach Injured In Plane Crash

A file photo of author Richard Bach, in 1975.
Associated Press

Pilot and author Richard Bach was hurt Friday when the small plane he was flying tangled in power lines as he attempted to land, according to media reports.

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Participation Nation
12:09 pm
Sat September 1, 2012

Americans In Action, Helping Each Other And Making The Whole Country Better

With your help, we spent a month sharing stories about Americans taking action to make their world a better place.
Milos Luzanin iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat September 1, 2012 2:32 pm

Like a quietly efficient operating system whirring away in the innards of a supercomputer, a vast array of Americans — mostly unseen and unsung — spend hours and hours of every week working together to find ways to make their communities — and the whole country — better.

This is Participation Nation.

In a monthlong blog that ended Aug. 31, NPR collected stories of people actively helping other people, animals and the planet. Here is an executive summary of what we discovered.

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Around the Nation
6:12 am
Sat September 1, 2012

Gone But Not Forgotten, Isaac Leaves Messy Wake

Originally published on Sat September 1, 2012 3:31 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News, I'm Scott Simon. The remnants of Hurricane Isaac have now moved north, dumping heavy rain in Arkansas and Missouri. In Louisiana and Mississippi, it will take many weeks - if not months - to clean up the mess from the flooding and torrential downpours. As NPR's Russell Lewis reports, residents there are taking things kind of in stride, even as they need to rebuild yet again.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPLASHING WATER)

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U.S.
6:12 am
Sat September 1, 2012

Obama To Troops: 'We're Here To Help You'

Members of the military listen to President Obama during his visit to Fort Bliss, Texas, on Friday.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Sun September 2, 2012 11:09 pm

On Friday, President Obama was at Fort Bliss, Texas, where he spoke to troops and met with military families, including some who lost loved ones in Afghanistan.

As that war winds down, the president is ordering additional help for those with invisible battle scars. A rash of suicides has shown mental injuries can be just as deadly as a roadside bomb.

Surrounded by soldiers in camouflage fatigues, Obama recalled his last visit to Fort Bliss, exactly two years earlier. That was the day he announced a formal end to combat operations in Iraq.

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