National

Around the Nation
6:49 am
Fri August 31, 2012

40-Year-Old Cheese To Sell For $10 An Ounce

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 12:48 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Business
4:44 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Buffett Donates More To His Children's Foundations

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 12:48 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is Happy Birthday.

Turns out when you're a billionaire investor you can celebrate any way you want. Warren Buffett turned 82 yesterday and his wish was to give away billions, so he did, in the form of millions of dollars worth of his company stock. All told, those shares will eventually be worth about $3 billion. That gift was divided between his three children's charitable foundations.

NPR's Sonari Glinton has more.

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Around the Nation
4:44 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Slow-Moving Isaac Waterlogs Parts of Louisiana

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 12:48 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The remnants of Isaac have left Louisiana behind, but parts of the state will be rebuilding for a while. The storm brought extensive flooding to communities that had been largely spared during earlier hurricanes. NPR's Joel Rose rode along as Louisiana's governor toured one such town on the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain outside New Orleans.

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Around the Nation
4:44 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Yosemite Visitors Warned Of Hantavirus Outbreak

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 12:48 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The long Labor Day weekend means camping trips for many people, but some hoping to visit Yosemite National Park are changing their plans because of an outbreak of hantavirus, a rodent-borne disease. State health officials now say two people have died. Another four were infected after visiting the park this summer. As KQED's Lauren Sommer reports, there are new questions about whether the park should have warned visitors about the risk.

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Business
4:44 am
Fri August 31, 2012

For Oil Refineries, Isaac Was 'Mostly A Non Event'

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 12:48 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Apparently the oil market is alright too. Now that Isaac has passed, the major oil companies are looking to restart production in the Gulf of Mexico. With nearly all the production platforms shut down, many people expected to see a rise in oil prices. But instead we've seen in the last few days what looks like the typical movement of the market - a little down one day, a little up the next.

Isaac is proving far less disruptive than Hurricanes Katrina or Ivan. Here's NPR's Yuki Noguchi.

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Around the Nation
4:44 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Hurricane Isaac Cleanup Begins In Mississippi

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 12:48 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK. Isaac was a hurricane, then a tropical storm, and late last night it was downgraded to a tropical depression. But what's left of Isaac is still wreaking havoc on the Gulf Coast and beyond, as the storm moves inland. The main problem is flash flooding brought on by days of drenching rains that have strained dams and levees, and sent bays, rivers, and creeks swelling over their banks. The lingering effects of Isaac are complicating the cleanup, as NPR's Debbie Elliott reports.

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Business
4:44 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Norwalk, Ct., Schools Avert Budget Crisis

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 12:48 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And now let's report on a battle playing out on Norwalk, Connecticut. Eleven thousand students went back to school in Norwalk this week after a summer clash over budget cuts - the kinds of budget cuts that are familiar to people across this country. Dozens of teachers and other staff were reinstated in Norwalk, following protests by parents over the budget cuts.

As Kaomi Goetz of member station WSHU reports, parents are still frustrated.

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Author Interviews
3:24 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Against The Odds, A 'Miracle Boy Grows Up'

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 12:48 pm

Ben Mattlin has defied expectations for his entire life — starting with being alive at all. Mattlin has a condition called spinal muscular atrophy, and many infants born with it don't live past age 2. But Mattlin grew up to be one of the first students using a wheelchair to attend Harvard. He married, had a family and is now the author of a new memoir, Miracle Boy Grows Up: How the Disability Rights Revolution Saved My Sanity.

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StoryCorps
12:47 am
Fri August 31, 2012

A Veteran Cop Recalls A Tough Night On The Job

Mark Edens told his daughter Jessie about one night early in his career when he had to tell a woman her husband had died in a car accident. Edens was a police officer for 25 years. He told his story at StoryCorps in Atlanta.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 12:48 pm

This holiday weekend, state troopers across the country will be stepping up their patrols. Much of their work will be routine traffic stops, but some calls they will respond to will be accidents, some of them tragic.

Retired police officer Mark Edens, 61, spent half of his career investigating fatal car accidents for the Michigan State Police.

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The Salt
6:19 pm
Thu August 30, 2012

Two Sides Prepare For California Genetically Modified Labeling Vote

California farmer Erik Freese pulls down a healthy ear of corn that has been genetically engineered to produce its own pesticide. He says genetic engineering has helped him to farm more sustainably.
Kathleen Masterson for NPR

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 10:30 am

This November, voters in California will decide whether the state should require labels on foods with genetically engineered ingredients. If the initiative, known as Proposition 37, passes, manufacturers would have to say somewhere on the front or the back of the food's packaging if the product contains or may contain genetically engineered ingredients.

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All Tech Considered
6:09 pm
Thu August 30, 2012

Drone-Tracking App Gets No Traction From Apple

An unmanned U.S. Predator drone flies over Kandahar Air Field in Afghanistan in 2010. Apple has rejected an app that tracks U.S. drone strikes around the world.
Kirsty Wigglesworth AP

Cellphones have ushered in an age of interruption, with apps that notify you when you're mentioned on Facebook or Twitter, or even if your favorite ball team scores a run.

But Apple is the ultimate arbiter of what kinds of notifications iPhone users can receive — and some apps just don't pass muster with the tech giant.

Take Josh Begley's idea, for example. Begley created an app that sends a push notification — or beep — to an iPhone whenever there is a U.S. drone strike anywhere in the world.

Apple blocked it from its App Store.

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Participation Nation
5:33 pm
Thu August 30, 2012

Garden Of Youth In Moab, Utah

Watering the corn.
Courtesy of YGP

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 6:24 pm

The mission of the Youth Garden Project in Moab is to cultivate healthy children, families and communities through educational programs and the profound act of connecting people — from seed to table.

The project works to fulfill this mission by organizing the local Farmers' Market, providing a CSA program, inviting the community to Weed N Feeds, hosting fundraisers like Garden Dinners and organizing large community events like Pumpkin Chuckin'.

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Law
4:57 pm
Thu August 30, 2012

Federal Court Rejects Texas' Voter ID Law As Unfair

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 6:09 pm

A federal three judge panel has struck down a new voter ID law in Texas, ruling that it would disproportionately harm Hispanic and African American voters, who are less likely to have the required photo identification. Pam Fessler talks to Melissa Block.

The Salt
4:57 pm
Thu August 30, 2012

On the Farmers Market Frontier, It's Not Just About Profit

On a corner in Washington, D.C., where stores burned during riots 44 years ago, there's now a plaza where farmers sell produce on Saturday mornings.
Dan Charles/NPR

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 10:30 am

Farmers markets are popping up in cities all across the country, and people expect lots of different things from them: Better food, of course, but also economic development and even friendlier neighborhoods.

At its core, though, the farmers market is a business, and it won't survive unless the farmer makes money.

So what's the key to success for these markets?

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Around the Nation
4:57 pm
Thu August 30, 2012

Despite Drought, Some Corn Farmers Reap Bounty

Grimes Sweetcorn worker Paulette Vandyke waits to sell fresh corn in Grimes, Iowa. The drought has pushed the price of corn per bushel up nearly 40 percent in the past two months.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 8:18 pm

For every farmer who is hurting this year during the drought, others are benefiting. Many fields in the South, Northwest and Upper Midwest are producing bountiful corn crops. And because the drought has pushed prices to record highs, farmers who have corn to sell expect a terrific payday.

"The corn has actually really, really taken off all the way through season. It's grown fast. It's been accelerated. The corn looks really good now," says John Scott, whose family farm in Sargeant, Minn., is just bursting with corn.

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