National

The Two-Way
7:22 am
Mon July 30, 2012

Long Legal Process Begins For Colorado Shooting Suspect

James Holmes, in an Arapahoe County, Colo., court on July 23.
AP

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 8:46 am

  • Kirk Siegler on 'Morning Edition'

Months of pre-trial legal arguments begin in earnest this morning when James Holmes, the man accused of killing 12 people and wounding 58 others in a July 20 shooting rampage at a movie theater in Aurora, Colo., appears in an Arapahoe County, Colo., court.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
4:57 am
Mon July 30, 2012

Magnets May Pull Kids With Sunken Chests Out Of Operating Room

A cross-sectional X-ray shows what's called a "sunken chest." The bright circle near the bottom is the spine; the gray blob on the right is the heart.
Living LLC Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 8:24 am

You may not have heard of pectus excavatum — or "sunken chest," as it's commonly known — but there's a good chance you know someone who was born with it.

It's the most common deformity of the chest wall, affecting roughly one in 500 people — boys much more often than girls. And while sunken chest can be corrected with surgery, the procedure is invasive and very painful. Many families won't do it.

Read more
Health
4:56 am
Mon July 30, 2012

Cheer Up, It's Just Your Child Behind The Wheel

When it comes to learning how to drive, your teen is probably as harried as you are. Research shows that scare tactics meant to instill caution, though, are less effective than kind words.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 3:41 pm

One rite of passage most teenagers look forward to and parents dread is learning how to drive. Car crashes are the No. 1 killer of teens by far, on the order of five times more than poisoning or cancer. Does that mean you should scare the daylights out of teens to encourage safe driving? Traditional driver education classes tend to do exactly that, with gruesome videos and photos of fatalities and smashed-up cars.

Read more
Economy
7:38 am
Sun July 29, 2012

Business In A Slump: Scraping By Three Years Later

Originally published on Sun July 29, 2012 11:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Read more
Sports
7:38 am
Sun July 29, 2012

Major Baseball Dreams In The Minor Leagues

Originally published on Sun July 29, 2012 11:58 am

While Major League baseball is big and epic, there's something magical about sitting in a small stadium. Guest host David Greene reports on the progress of Minor League Baseball player Tyler Saladino at one of his team's away games. Saladino is an infielder for Alabama's Birmingham Barons.

It's All Politics
6:34 am
Sun July 29, 2012

Politics Doesn't Trump All: A Bipartisan Love Story

Jessica Grounds and Wes McClelland say their Christian faith helps ease the tension of their disparate professional identities.
Marissa Alioto NPR

Originally published on Tue July 31, 2012 9:47 am

He advises a powerful House Republican. She recruits women into politics after years as a consultant for Democratic candidates.

He grew up conservative and likes to joke about the "money tree" at the Democratic National Convention. Her childhood home was politically progressive and included an autographed portrait from the Clinton White House.

Read more
Americandy: Sweet Land Of Liberty
5:59 am
Sun July 29, 2012

In New Mexico, A Brittle Treat That Smolders

Nut brittles from the Las Cruces Candy Company are studded with pecans, pistachios and almonds, and infused with New Mexico's signature chili peppers — both green and red.
Melisa Goh NPR

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 11:20 am

New Mexicans can get a little carried away with their chile peppers. There's chile beer, chile pizza, chile ice cream — you can find the smoldering flavors of chile peppers in just about anything.

And then there's chile brittle. Luis Flores, owner of chili brittle purveyor Las Cruces Candy Company, beats the summer heat by getting up at 3 a.m. to prepare his specialties.

Read more
Religion
4:53 pm
Sat July 28, 2012

U.S. Still Religious, But Trust In Institutions Wanes

The cross on the steeple of St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church in Henryville, Ind. A recent Gallup poll says only 44 percent of Americans have "great confidence" in organized religion.
Michael Conroy AP

Originally published on Sat July 28, 2012 7:05 pm

Something is happening when it comes to religion in America.

Though more Americans go to church or believe in God than their counterparts in virtually every other Western country, fewer Americans now trust religious institutions. A recent Gallup poll showed that just 44 percent of Americans have a great deal of confidence in "the church or organized religion."

Read more
Around the Nation
6:21 am
Sat July 28, 2012

Gang Violence Smolders On Hot Chicago Streets

The Chicago police gang enforcement unit makes an arrest after stopping a car with four suspected gang members in June.
Robert Ray AP

Originally published on Sat July 28, 2012 6:12 pm

This has been a summer of blood, sweat and tears in Chicago. The city has been scorched by historic heat, and the homicide rate has soared. When the sun goes down behind the glimmering lakeshore skyline, blocks on the South and West Side of the city can ring with shots and sirens.

The streets of neighborhoods like Englewood, Grand Crossing and Garfield Park are empty, even during the day. In the middle of this summer, it is rare to see a child ride a bike or walk a dog.

Read more
U.S.
6:20 am
Sat July 28, 2012

Hot, Dry, Tapped Out: Drought Shrivels Fun, Too

Don't call 'em greens: Some golf courses, such as this one in Syracuse, N.Y., are letting their signature green grass go to brown in an effort to save water.
Dennis Nett The Post-Standard/Landov

Originally published on Sat July 28, 2012 8:57 am

The drought that's hit huge swathes of the country is also draining the audiences for outdoor activities.

Just look at the Fox River, about 50 miles southwest of Chicago. Water swirls and plunges over a dam in Yorkville, Ill. Normally there'd be lots of folks canoeing or kayaking here, but not today.

"As you can see most of my canoes are just sitting," says Greg Freeman, the owner of Freeman Sports Shop.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
6:20 am
Sat July 28, 2012

New Funds Could Shorten Waiting Lists For AIDS Drugs

The pharmacy at Atlanta's Ponce de Leon Center stocks medications for 5,200 HIV/AIDS patients. Workers there aren't sure how much an increase in federal aid will help cut Georgia's waiting list for a HIV drug-assistance program.
Jim Burress WABE, Atlanta

Originally published on Sat July 28, 2012 11:07 am

The Obama administration last week announced nearly $80 million in grants to increase access to AIDS care across the United States. But will the money be enough to eliminate waiting lists for the AIDS Drug Assistance Program?

Advocates aren't sure. The program, known as ADAP, provides a safety net for people with HIV who have no means of paying for the drugs they need to fight the virus.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
7:17 pm
Fri July 27, 2012

Longtime Chick-Fil-A Spokesman Dies

The longtime spokesman of the fast-food chain Chick-fil-A has died.

The Atlanta-based company released a statement Friday announcing the death of Don Perry, 60.

"Don was a member of our Chick-fil-A family for nearly 29 years. For many of you in the media, he was the spokesperson for Chick-fil-A. He was a well-respected and well-liked media executive in the Atlanta and University of Georgia communities, and we will all miss him."

Read more
American Dreams: Then And Now
5:10 pm
Fri July 27, 2012

Rebirth: From Millionaire To Prisoner To Pastor

Vernon Jackson leaving the U.S. District Court in Alexandria, Va., in 2006. He later went to prison for three years on bribery charges.
Caleb Jones AP

Originally published on Fri July 27, 2012 8:18 pm

Many of us strive to achieve the American dream just once in our lifetimes. But Vernon Jackson has already lived two versions of the American dream: invention and reinvention.

Once a tech millionaire, this pastor from Louisville, Ky., thought his telecommunications device would bring him wealth and success. And it did, but only for a time. Ultimately, his business dealings landed him in prison.

Jackson's story is about making it big, blowing it even bigger — and coming back, renewed.

Today, he can laugh about his roller-coaster-like transformation.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
5:08 pm
Fri July 27, 2012

Cost Of Treatment Still A Challenge For HIV Patients In U.S.

Ruben Bermudez stands in front of a sign that says in Spanish, "To love yourself is to protect yourself." He has struggled to remain eligible for AIDS drug assistance programs since he went on treatment four years ago.
Jessica Camille Aguirre NPR

Originally published on Sat July 28, 2012 11:08 am

When Ruben Bermudez, 31, found out that he had HIV more than a decade ago, he didn't want to take his medicine. He went on treatment for a few weeks, but said the intensive pill regimen made him feel dizzy.

He stopped treatment and tried to ignore the diagnosis, moving to Florida from Washington in pursuit of sunshine. In 2008, he learned that one of his best friends died of a brain tumor that couldn't be treated because his immune system has been debilitated by AIDS. Bermudez realized that his only chance at a relatively healthy life would depend on taking pills daily.

Read more
Health Care
4:24 pm
Fri July 27, 2012

Affordable Care Act's Insurance Rebates In The Mail

Originally published on Fri July 27, 2012 6:02 pm

Robert Siegel talks with Julie Rovner about an immediate effect of the new health care law — rebate checks — how they vary, and why some insurers owe Americans money.

Pages