National

Religion
7:10 pm
Tue October 9, 2012

Study Finds Americans Less Religious Than Ever

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

As we watch polls in the presidential race bounce around, here's a poll that shows a consistent shift in American society. More people than ever before consider themselves religiously unaffiliated. That's a key finding in a survey out today from the Pew Research Center's Forum on Religion and Public Life. And coauthor Gregory Smith joins us to talk about it. Welcome, Gregory.

GREGORY SMITH: Thank you for having me.

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Television
4:57 pm
Tue October 9, 2012

'Sesame Street' Tries To Keep Big Bird Out Of Politics

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 7:10 pm

When Mitt Romney said he would cut PBS funding in the first presidential debate — and singled out Big Bird, whom he said he liked a lot — he perhaps inadvertently introduced the befeathered yellow children's icon smack into the center of political debate. President Obama approved a cable-only commercial dinging Romney for going after Sesame Street rather than Wall Street, but Romney appears to think he has a winning hand — castigating the president for focusing on a profitable educational puppet empire rather than big issues, like terrorism in the Arab world.

Law
4:55 pm
Tue October 9, 2012

Sandusky Sentenced To At Least 30 Years In Prison

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 7:10 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky will most likely spend the rest of his life in prison. Sandusky was convicted in June of sexually abusing 10 boys. And today, he was sentenced to at least 30 years in a state correctional facility.

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Education
4:53 pm
Tue October 9, 2012

How Does Affirmative Action Impact Colleges?

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 7:10 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

What happens when race is taken out of university admissions? In 1996, California voters passed Proposition 209, which bans state government institutions including the universities from considering race, sex or ethnicity in their policies. The results of Prop 209 are in dispute, and that dispute is argued in briefs filed in the Fisher case. The president and chancellors of the University of California have filed a brief in support of the University of Texas' plan.

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Business
4:51 pm
Tue October 9, 2012

Wal-Mart, American Express To Debut New Card

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 7:10 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
4:48 pm
Tue October 9, 2012

Sound Of Your City: Construction, Food Truck, Parks

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 7:10 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Some city sounds sent by our audience now to get us back down to Earth.

(SOUNDBITE OF HAMMERING)

AMANDA BELL: My name is Amanda Bell(ph). And this is the sound of construction in Waynesburg, Pennsylvania.

(SOUNDBITE OF HAMMERING AND MACHINERY)

ANASTASIA KETERICHKOV: My name is Anastasia Keterichkov(ph), This is the sound of Hartford Manufacturing jeans.

(SOUNDBITE OF MACHINERY)

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Around the Nation
4:47 pm
Tue October 9, 2012

Mich. Unions Want Bargaining Added To Constitution

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 7:10 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From Ohio now to Michigan, where labor unions are betting big this election. They're throwing their weight behind not one, but three new ballot proposals. The most ambitious of the three would enshrine collective bargaining rights in the state's constitution. As Michigan Public Radio's Rick Pluta reports, that could reverse as many as 170 state laws that currently limit union bargaining power and fundraising.

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Presidential Race
4:45 pm
Tue October 9, 2012

Romney Talks Regulation, Farming In Iowa

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 7:10 pm

Audie Cornish talks with Ari Shapiro about Mitt Romney's campaigning in the Midwest on Tuesday.

Presidential Race
4:45 pm
Tue October 9, 2012

Obama In Ohio On Last Voter Registration Day

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 7:10 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Mitt Romney's day began in Iowa and ends in Ohio and that's where President Obama is as well for an evening rally in Columbus. NPR's Scott Horsley is already in Columbus and he joins us now. And Scott, the reaction to last week's debate has been mostly negative for President Obama. Are his Ohio supporters worried about that?

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NPR Story
4:33 pm
Tue October 9, 2012

Supreme Court To Take Up Affirmative Action Case

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 7:10 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Tomorrow, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in a landmark case about race and college admissions. In 2008, a white student named Abigail Fisher sued the University of Texas in Austin. Ms. Fisher claimed she was denied admission to UT because of her race.

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Around the Nation
4:27 pm
Tue October 9, 2012

Instead Of Surgery, Man Pedals Off The Pounds

Ernest Gagnon weighed 570 pounds before he decided to lose weight by taking up cyclocross racing. Forgoing surgery, Gagnon lost more than 200 pounds and recently competed in his first cyclocross race.
Courtesy of Ernest Gagnon

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 11:02 pm

A lot of Americans are struggling to lose a whole lot of weight, and they try all kinds of crazy things.

Ernest Gagnon — a man from Billerica, Mass. — decided to shed pounds by getting into the often intense, high-adrenaline sport of cyclocross: racing road bikes on obstacle courses.

Two years ago, Gagnon tipped the scales at 570 pounds. He was depressed and embarrassed to leave the house.

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The Salt
4:13 pm
Tue October 9, 2012

Restaurant Discounts For Gastric Bypass Patients May Send Mixed Messages

People who have had gastric bypass surgery qualify for discounts at popular restaurants, including buffets.
coolmikeol Flickr.com

Originally published on Wed October 10, 2012 8:31 am

Every year, hundreds of thousands of Americans turn to stomach-shrinking bariatric procedures, hoping for extreme weight loss.

All of these reduced appetites might seem like bad news for the restaurant business, but surgeon-distributed food discount cards aim to make dining out cheaper and more practical for gastric bypass patients.

But is this kind of encouragement really a good idea?

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It's All Politics
4:03 pm
Tue October 9, 2012

Study: Unemployment Discussion Differs By Swing State

Job seekers line up to register at a Miami job fair in January. A new study shows that Florida voters discuss joblessness in ways quite different from those in Ohio and Virginia, two other presidential battleground states.
Alan Diaz AP

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 5:21 pm

Dante Chinni is the director of Patchwork Nation, which uses demographic, voting and cultural data to study communities. It is part of the nonpartisan, not-for-profit Jefferson Institute, which teamed with NPR to examine what can be learned about different communities through online text analysis. The project had Knight Foundation funding.


Since the beginning of the Great Recession, unemployment has driven much of the national conversation, and with good reason.

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It's All Politics
4:00 pm
Tue October 9, 2012

Young 'Nones' Set To Transform The Political Landscape

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 4:50 pm

Culture warriors on the left and right would be wise to carefully examine a new survey from the Pew Research Center showing that a growing number of Americans are moving away from religious labels.

The study, titled "Nones" on the Rise, indicates that 1 in 5 Americans now identifies as "religiously unaffiliated," a group that includes those who say they have no particular religion, as well as atheists and agnostics.

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U.S.
2:41 pm
Tue October 9, 2012

Getting To Yes On Gay Marriage, One Voter At A Time

Rion Tucker is a canvasser for Equality Maine. The organization is working to get supporters to the polls on Election Day, to vote for a ballot initiative legalizing same-sex marriage.
Michael May for NPR

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 7:10 pm

Rion Tucker is covering a lot of ground in his home state of Maine these days. The 20-year-old is a canvasser for Equality Maine, and he's been knocking on lots of doors in an effort to make sure that voters in his state pass a ballot initiative in November legalizing same-sex marriage.

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