National

Around the Nation
7:45 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Car Hits Cross-Country Runner But She Keeps Going

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 9:05 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

It is definitely wrong to hit and run, but it's a little impressive that a high school student was hit and kept running. Anaheim, California police say a high school cross country team was running when a turning car whacked one of the runners. The young woman was apparently determined, because she got backed up and ran away. The driver called after her to stop, stayed where he was and called police. The runner was eventually treated and suffered only minor injuries.

Business
6:10 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Data Show It Was A Gloomy June For Many Retailers

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 12:10 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a retail's lousy summer.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: It's been sunny in much of the country, but inside many stores, the attitude is gloomy - or at least it was during the month of June. The latest sales figures are in, and they show many consumers were not in a buying mood last month. NPR's Wade Goodwyn has more.

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News
4:39 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Fake Bylines Reveal True Costs Of Local News

Newspapers acknowledged publishing dozens of items in print or online from outsourcing firm Journatic that appeared under fake bylines. The Chicago Tribune, for example, said the matter is under investigation. But the newspaper's corporate parent, the Tribune Co., is a new investor in Journatic.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 12:10 pm

Major newspapers in Chicago, Houston and San Francisco are among those this week that have acknowledged they published dozens of items in print or online that appeared under fake bylines.

As was first disclosed by the public radio program This American Life, the items in question were not written by reporters on the staffs of the papers at all but by employees of what is effectively a news outsourcing firm called Journatic.

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The Salt
3:27 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Laws That Target Homeless Imperil Programs That Feed Them Outdoors

Volunteers distribute food outside a Philadelphia Department of Public Health hearing in March on rules banning outdoor food distribution.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 9:20 pm

A growing number of cities want to tackle the problem of homelessness by outlawing what are known as "acts of daily living" — sleeping, eating and panhandling in public. In Philadelphia, a new rule is targeting not the homeless but those who feed them.

When Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter announced the ban on serving food in public parks last March, he said moving such services indoors was part of an effort to raise standards for the homeless.

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Around the Nation
3:19 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Despite Delays, Chair Lifts Coming To Public Pools

New government regulations require public pools to have chair lifts, like this one in Savannah, Ga., for people with disabilities. The compliance deadline has been extended for a second time.
Russ Bynum AP

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 9:20 pm

Pools open to the public were supposed to have chair lifts installed for people with disabilities in time for this summer, but after a wave of protests, the federal order was delayed until January.

Still, some of the country's 300,000 or so pools at hotels, parks and gyms continue to fight the requirement.

Vestavia Hills pool near Birmingham, Ala., is one of thousands of pools that scrambled to get a chair lift installed by May.

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Health
3:18 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Kenya's HIV Challenge: Easing Stigma For Gay Men

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 9:20 pm

Health officials in Kenya say reducing the transmission of HIV among gay men is a central part of their national AIDS strategy. But they face serious challenges, including the fact that homosexuality is still a crime in the East African nation.

HIV rates among gay and bisexual men in Kenya are far higher than the national average.

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Business
3:02 am
Fri July 6, 2012

For Some Businesses, Daily Deals Have A Dark Side

Creative Hands is a therapy center in Washington, D.C., that used daily deals when it opened last year. Instead of bolstering revenue, the deals left Creative Hands' owner in the red.
Ebony Bailey NPR

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 9:20 pm

Groupon and Living Social have sold tens of millions of daily deals and are now a major force in retail. But they rely heavily on getting businesses to offer their goods and services at deep discounts. In exchange, businesses hope for payoff in the form of return customers.

Sometimes, though, the flood of extra business causes more problems than it solves.

Deal-Hungry Crowd

Ailie Ham had just opened Creative Hands Massage in Washington, D.C., when she decided to offer deals through Living Social and Groupon last year.

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The Salt
5:32 pm
Thu July 5, 2012

Tim Burton Pies Spin Fantasy Into Sugar And Art

A Tim Burton-inspired lemon cream pie with chocolate crumb crust in the 2011 Good Food Pie Contest.
KCRW

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 10:18 pm

When you decide to hold a pie contest at a prominent art museum, it's hard to ignore all the inspiration around you. And so it happened that last year the Los Angeles County Museum of Art hosted our station KCRW's 3rd Annual Good Food Pie Contest. When we realized that an impressive show of more than 700 Tim Burton works would be up, we immediately had a new category.

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Politics
5:06 pm
Thu July 5, 2012

Obama Touts Auto Industry On Bus Tour

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 6:23 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Demand is up in the car industry. That's great news for U.S. automakers. They're on track to have their best year since 2008 and it's a success that President Obama is seizing on as he campaigns across northern Ohio today. The president began a two-day bus tour that will also take him into western Pennsylvania.

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Health Care
4:48 pm
Thu July 5, 2012

Power Of Pain Prescription Database Stops At Borders

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 6:23 pm

States are banding together to try to combat prescription drug abuse. Doctors in many states check a database before prescribing medication. But there's no way for doctors who live on the border to check neighboring states. Now there's a move to change that.

London 2012: The Summer Olympics
4:48 pm
Thu July 5, 2012

At Last, Superheavyweight Finds Her Olympic Niche

Holley Mangold successfully completes the 145 kilogram "clean and jerk" lift at the trials for the U.S. Olympic women's weightlifting team in March. Mangold came to weightlifting after trying her hand at several other sports.
Jamie Sabau Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:39 pm

Near the back of the North YMCA in Columbus, Ohio, several men and women line up on a row of beat-up platforms. They take turns practicing the two lifts that make up Olympic weightlifting; the "Snatch," and the "Clean and Jerk."

The goal? To hoist large amounts of weight from the floor into an overhead position.

Among the lifters here is 5-foot-8 inch, 350-pound Holley Mangold. She is the epitome of power, in appearance, attitude and athletic ability.

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Health Care
4:48 pm
Thu July 5, 2012

How Will States Set Up Health Care Exchanges?

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 6:23 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Among the provisions of the health care law is that each state has to set up a health insurance exchange, a marketplace where people can compare health plans and then purchase coverage. There are lots of questions about how this will work and we'll try to answer some of them now with Alan Weil. He's the executive director with the nonprofit National Academy for State Health Policy.

Alan Weil, welcome to the program.

ALAN WEIL: It's good to be here.

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Around the Nation
4:48 pm
Thu July 5, 2012

When Does A Tree Go From Decorative To Dangerous?

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 6:23 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Let's face it. When we call someplace a tree-lined street in a leafy suburb, the implication is not that its residents live among deadly hazards. The intent is generally flattering. We like trees - you know, radio shows are hosted by fools like me, but only God can make a tree - except when 70-mile-per-hour winds blow through your neighborhood, as they did in many neighborhoods around Washington, D.C. last Friday.

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
4:48 pm
Thu July 5, 2012

A Company Town Reinvents Itself In South Bend, Ind.

Pete Buttigieg, 30, is the first mayor of South Bend, Ind., born after car manufacturer Studebaker left town.
Peter Hoffman for NPR

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 1:55 pm

There are two truths about South Bend, Ind. No. 1: You can't escape the influence of the University of Notre Dame. No. 2: You can't escape the ghost of Studebaker.

South Bend may be best known as the home of the Fighting Irish, but it was once the home of Studebaker automobiles. When Studebaker closed in 1963, it left a gaping hole in the town, where unemployment is at 10.4 percent, according to the latest data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Now, the city is working hard to create a second act for the commercial life of South Bend.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:47 pm
Thu July 5, 2012

Medicaid Expansion: Who's In? Who's Out?

A map of the U.S. shows the states that have declined to expand Medicaid after the Supreme Court's decision on the Accountable Care Act.
Center for American Progress

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 4:54 pm

In the week since the Supreme Court upheld almost all of President Obama's health care law, some of the biggest action has been on the Medicaid front, where the administration definitely lost.

Until last week, the Affordable Care Act was expected to drive an expansion of Medicaid to the tune of about 17 million more people being covered over the next 10 years.

The Affordable Care Act, as written, would have required states to provide Medicaid coverage to adults, whether they have children or not, with incomes up to 133 percent of the federal poverty level.

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