National

House & Senate Races
4:49 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Akin Faces Another Deadline To Leave Senate Race

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 12:00 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Let's talk now about one of this fall's key Senate races. In Missouri, Republican candidate Todd Akin is launching a bus tour today. You may remember he's the congressman whose controversial comments about rape led to calls that he drop out of the race. Today is the last day for Akin to remove himself from the ballot. He has made clear that is not going to happen. But he has an uphill fight to unseat the Democratic incumbent, Claire McCaskill. She has the financial advantage and she has the lead in the polls.

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Middle East
4:49 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Mideast: 'Traditionally A 2nd-Term Problem' For U.S.

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 11:45 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Israeli officials made it known that Prime Minister Netanyahu wanted to see President Obama during his visit to the U.S. For a variety of reasons, the president was not available. The two men have had a strained relationship.

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World
4:49 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Clinton Kicks off A Busy Week Of Diplomacy

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 12:00 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

President Obama addresses the United Nations General Assembly today, at a time when U.S. embassies and consulates have been the target of protests across the Muslim world. Mr. Obama's aides say he will use this speech to again condemn the anti-Islam video that offended many Muslims.

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Around the Nation
4:49 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Preservation Jazz Hall Band Releases 2 Albums

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 12:00 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And now from the up and coming we turn to a band celebrating its 50th birthday.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: That's the sound of the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, named for the Jazz House in the French Quarter where they play. To mark 50 years, the New Orleans group is releasing two albums today.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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It's All Politics
3:29 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Romney's Medicaid Remarks On '60 Minutes' Raise Eyebrows

Mitt Romney talks with 60 Minutes correspondent Scott Pelley.
AP

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 4:21 pm

It's not so much what Mitt Romney said about whether the government should guarantee people health care in his interview on CBS's 60 Minutes Sunday that has health care policy types buzzing. It's how that compares to what he has said before.

To back up a bit, Scott Pelley asked the former Massachusetts governor if he thinks "the government has a responsibility to provide health care to the 50 million Americans who don't have it today?"

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Business
3:27 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Chicago Pits Quieter, But Traders' Outcries Linger

Traders work in the bond pit at the Chicago Board of Trade in 1995. In recent decades, much of the trading has left the pits and gone electronic.
Michael S. Green AP

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 8:18 pm

The trading pits at the Chicago Board of Trade and the Mercantile Exchange have long been potent symbols of American capitalism. And they used to be as rough and tumble as the city itself, where burly men bought and sold commodities like hogs, cattle, corn and soybeans.

Trading volume has gone up considerably in recent years, but Chicago's trading pits are tamer places today — the result of a revolution futures trading has undergone over the past quarter century. Much of the trading has left the pits and gone electronic.

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Around the Nation
3:25 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Phone Home: Tech Draws Parents, College Kids Closer

University of North Carolina sophomore Julia-Scott Dawson (left) and her mother, Robin, use text-messaging, email and social media to stay in touch.
Courtesy of Robin Dawson

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 12:00 pm

From breakfast to bedtime, college sophomore Julia-Scott Dawson and her mother, Robin Dawson, exchange a flurry of texts that include I love you's, inside jokes and casual chitchat.

"We talk every day," Dawson says.

"Every day," echoes her mother.

Julia-Scott Dawson is a sophomore at the University of North Carolina, which is just a 15-minute drive from where her parents live. Every week, she shares a Sunday meal with her family and grabs morning coffee with her parents when they can.

"I just love the time I spend with them," Dawson says.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:19 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Doctors Sift Through Patients' Genomes To Solve Medical Mysteries

Sara Terry and her son, Christian, in Spring, Texas. After sequencing Christian's genome, doctors were able to diagnose him with a Noonan-like syndrome.
Eric Kayne for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 12:00 pm

Sara Terry's first clue that something was wrong with her son, Christian, came just three weeks after he was born.

"We went to check on him, just like any parents go and check on their kids just to make sure they're breathing," says Terry, 34, of Spring, Texas. "And we found him in his crib, and he wasn't breathing. He was blue."

She and her husband were horrified. They rushed Christian to the hospital and learned he had several medical problems.

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Shots - Health Blog
6:33 pm
Mon September 24, 2012

New Virus Related To SARS Detected In The Middle East

Different types of coronaviruses can cause a simple cold or a deadly respiratory illness, such as SARS.
BSIP UIG via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 2:52 pm

A mysterious virus has put a Qatari man in critical condition at a U.K. hospital, the World Health Organization said Sunday.

His illness is due to a new type of coronavirus, the family of viruses that causes common colds and severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS.

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It's All Politics
6:30 pm
Mon September 24, 2012

Romney Thwacks Obama For Calling Libya And Other Hotspots 'Bumps'

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney shakes hands at an aircraft museum in Pueblo, Colo., Monday.
Bryan Oller AP

Originally published on Mon September 24, 2012 7:00 pm

It's taken as a given that American voters in 2012 aren't as concerned about foreign policy as they are the domestic economy.

It's also accepted as true that on matters of foreign policy, President Obama has an advantage over his Republican challenger, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, who lacks significant firsthand foreign policy experience.

But Romney has made it a point lately to show that he's not ceding foreign policy and national security to Obama.

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Political Junkie
6:27 pm
Mon September 24, 2012

As Polls Show Romney Trailing In Swing States, Obama Edges Towards 270 Goal

It's true that Mitt Romney trails President Obama in most key battleground states, but the margins are in single digits
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 5:04 pm

The election is not over, we are told time and time again, and it's not. There are still some 40-plus days to go, there are still debates to be had. It's true that Mitt Romney trails President Obama in most key battleground states, but the margins are in single digits. And, lest we forget, it's not that presidential candidates down in the polls haven't come from behind to win in the past.

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It's All Politics
6:13 pm
Mon September 24, 2012

Record Number Of Early Votes Expected Ahead Of Election Day

Tuesday marks six weeks until Election Day, but registered voters in two dozen states are already able to cast a ballot for president, with more states to allow early voting in the coming weeks.

In the 2000 presidential election, early voting accounted for 15 percent of the total ballots cast. By 2008, that doubled to 30 percent, according to the United States Elections Project at George Mason University. It's expected to be on the rise again this year.

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The Two-Way
5:32 pm
Mon September 24, 2012

New Yorkers Rush By As Embattled Anti-Jihad Ads Hit The Subway

Ads condemning radical Islam went up in the New York City subway system today. The transit authority posted them after losing a legal battle with the ads' sponsor.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 11:44 am

Starting today, New York commuters are passing controversial new ads equating radical Muslims with "savages."

New York's Metro Transit Authority posted the ads in 10 subway stations today after a losing a legal battle with the pro-Israel group the American Freedom Defense Initiative.

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Election 2012
5:09 pm
Mon September 24, 2012

Early Voting Grows In Popularity Across Country

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 5:11 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

So six weeks to go before Election Day, but in-person early voting has already started in a handful of states. Many others will begin soon, and more and more of us are choosing to vote early. In Colorado, for example, where we just heard from Ari Shapiro, nearly 80 percent of votes were cast early in the 2008 presidential election.

Michael McDonald tracks these trends with the U.S. Elections Project at George Mason University and he joins me now. Welcome to the program.

MICHAEL MCDONALD: Oh, thank you for having me.

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Around the Nation
4:43 pm
Mon September 24, 2012

Aung San Suu Kyi Makes Midwest Detour On U.S. Visit

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 5:11 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Aung San Suu Kyi is on her first trip to the U.S. in decades. After years under house arrest, she is now a member of parliament in Myanmar, also known as Burma. So far, she's collected honors and drawn crowds in the places you might expect: New York City, Washington, D.C. But tomorrow, she heads to a smaller community in the Midwest. Sean Bueter, of member station WBOI, explains where she's going and why.

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