National

Around the Nation
6:54 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Ohio Octogenarians Skydive For Charity

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:37 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. George H. W. Bush, the first president Bush, made news since leaving office by jumping out of airplanes. Marjorie Bryan says she'd like to join him sometime. She's 83, and on Saturday she parachuted from a plan over Lima, Ohio, as did 82-year-old Marianna Sherman. They raised money for the Blue Star Mothers, whose kids served in the military. They jumped with a retired sergeant who has accompanied the ex-president in midair. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Education
5:13 am
Mon June 25, 2012

N.C. School Districts Fight Online Charter School

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:37 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A lot of taxpayer money is at stake in this next story. The number of public charter schools is growing. When they attract students, they also attract public funding - and that is also true when the charter school is an online school.

One dominant force in creating online charter schools is a company called K-12. Now, traditional school districts are fighting the company's efforts to set up a virtual academy.

Here's Dave DeWitt of North Carolina Public Radio.

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Business
5:13 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Google Expected To Delve Into Tablet Computers

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:37 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Google will host thousands of Android app developers this week at its annual conference. And there are rumors Google will also unveil its own tablet computer to compete with Apple's iPad.

NPR's Steve Henn has more.

STEVE HENN, BYLINE: Last week, Microsoft announced it was getting into the hardware business and unveiled the Surface - its new tablet computer.

Carolina Milanesi, who covers consumer devices at Gartner, says we are seeing a trend.

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Politics
5:13 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Rep. Rangel Campaigns In Changing N.Y. District

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:37 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

New Yorkers vote tomorrow in a primary election that will test one of the most vivid personalities in Congress.

Democrat Charlie Rangel was a historic figure when he won election from Harlem in 1970, and has been an influential voice since the Watergate hearings a few years later. Two years ago, he survived a difficult reelection campaign after an ethics scandal. Now Rangel faces a vigorous challenge in a congressional district that has changed dramatically since he first took office.

Here's NPR's Joel Rose.

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Around the Nation
5:13 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Georgia To Begin Sales Of Cross-State Health Insurance Policies

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 4:57 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We're expecting soon to learn Supreme Court decisions on two gigantic cases. One case involves the Arizona immigration law. The federal government has challenged that law as an intrusion into federal authority.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Justices are also deciding the constitutionality of President Obama's health care law. The main challenge is to the individual mandate, which after 2014 would require most people to get health insurance or pay a fine.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:02 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Obesity Stokes Rheumatoid Arthritis With More Than Just Extra Weight

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that can cause painful inflammation in the fingers and other joints.
Richard Rudisill iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 11:36 am

Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that causes painful joint inflammation and can be debilitating for many people who suffer from it. New research shows that the female hormone estrogen, along with proteins produced by the body's fat cells, may play an important role in the development of the disease.

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Environment
3:00 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Alaska Glacier Studied For Clues On Water Supply

Researchers measure the Eklutna glacier in Alaska to see how long the water it provides will last. The glacier supplies Anchorage with both drinking water and hydro power.
Annie Feidt for NPR

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:37 pm

Anchorage is one of the few North American cities that depend on a glacier for most of their drinking water. The Eklutna glacier also provides some of the city's electricity, through hydro power. So a team of researchers is working to answer a very important question: How long will the glacier's water supply last?

To get that answer, those researchers have to shovel a lot of snow. "It gets to be the consistency of really strong Styrofoam once you get down, maybe six or eight feet," glaciologist Louis Sass says as he flings pristine snow out of a growing hole in the glacier.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:57 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Many Migraines Can Be Prevented With Treatments, But Few Use Them

A promising crop of new migraine treatments could alleviate the suffering of millions of Americans.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 11:36 am

Millions of Americans suffer from migraine headaches so severe they miss work, social gatherings and important family events.

But that doesn't have to be the case, according to Charles Flippen, a University of California, Los Angeles, neurologist and researcher. "Everyone says, 'Oh, well, everyone has headaches,' so they just push through and suffer in silence," says Flippen.

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Dead Stop
2:55 am
Mon June 25, 2012

In Alaskan Cemetery, Native And Orthodox Rites Mix

A spirit house in the Eklutna Cemetery in Alaska.
Diana Derby

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 11:33 am

The first thing you see at Alaska's Eklutna Cemetery is a tidy white church, with copper-colored onion domes that are topped by the three-barred Russian Orthodox cross.

The church is a reminder of the days when Alaska was claimed by imperial Russia. But it hardly prepares you for the unique combination of Native American and Russian Orthodox influences in the graveyard beyond.

Our guide is Aaron Leggett, who waits patiently under a light but steady rain to explain his community's burial traditions.

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Politics
7:31 am
Sun June 24, 2012

'Who I Am': N.Y.C. Council Speaker On Politics, Faith

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene. Americans are growing more and more frustrated with the gridlock in Washington, D.C. In a Gallup poll out this month, only 17 percent of Americans said they approve of the job Congress is doing. Well, Christine Quinn says it does not have to be that way. She is the speaker of the New York City Council, and she's taken heat for seeming too close to the executive branch - that would be New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

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Fitness & Nutrition
7:31 am
Sun June 24, 2012

The Ultimate Superfood Meal

Food researchers in England have analyzed health claims on some 4,000 foods and came up with this super meal of superfoods: salmon terrine, chicken casserole and yogurt blancmange.

Education
6:29 am
Sun June 24, 2012

A Year Without Mexican-American Studies In Tucson

Protesters are seen in June 2011 in support of the Tucson Unified School District's Mexican-American studies program. A new state law effectively ended the program saying it was divisive.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 7:51 pm

An Arizona law that went into effect last year essentially ruled that the Mexican-American studies program offered in the Tucson public school system was divisive and should be scrapped. At the end of the first semester without the classes, hard feelings still linger.

For eight years, until this past January, Lorenzo Lopez taught Mexican-American studies at Cholla High in Tucson, Ariz., the very school from which he graduated in 1992.

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Shots - Health Blog
6:04 am
Sun June 24, 2012

Countdown To The Supreme Court's Ruling On Health Care

People wait outside the Supreme Court last week for word on the fate of the federal health overhaul law.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 8:46 am

Anticipation has reached a fever pitch, and the waiting is almost over.

This week, the Supreme Court is almost certain to issue its decision on the constitutionality of President Obama's health care law. The decision could have far-reaching implications for the legal landscape, the nation's health care system and even the Supreme Court's legacy.

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Presidential Race
5:52 pm
Sat June 23, 2012

Putting A Positive Spin On Negative Campaigning

The 1988 presidential race between George H.W. Bush and Michael Dukakis is often considered one of the most negative elections in the modern era.
Lennox McLendon AP

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 6:46 am

The general presidential election is still months away, but President Obama and presumptive Republican nominee Mitt Romney are already hammering each other with attack ads.

Obama's most recent ads criticize Romney's time as a so-called "corporate raider," while Romney has released several ads seizing upon the president's statement that the "private sector is doing fine."

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Around the Nation
4:56 pm
Sat June 23, 2012

University, Community Reacts To Sandusky Conviction

Originally published on Sat June 23, 2012 5:42 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

Jerry Sandusky will likely spend the rest of his life in prison. After just two days of deliberations, a jury found the former Penn State assistant coach guilty of sexually abusing 10 boys. He'll be sentenced in 90 days. But right now, the community where he lived and worked is trying to recover from the damage he caused.

NPR's Jeff Brady joins us from State College, Pennsylvania. And, Jeff, what are people saying about that verdict there today?

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