National

It's All Politics
2:32 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Ryan Slams Obama On Social Issues And Foreign Policy

Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan speaks Friday at the Values Voter Summit in Washington, D.C.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 4:31 pm

Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan used an appearance at an annual gathering of his party's social conservatives Friday to pointedly criticize President Obama's foreign policy record and to testify to his own Catholic faith and opposition to abortion.

"We're all in this together," said Ryan, a representative from Wisconsin, echoing a theme of Obama's convention speech. "It has a nice ring."

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NPR Story
1:49 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Microbes Benefit More Than Just The Gut

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 2:19 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

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'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup
12:54 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

It's All Politics, Sept. 13, 2012

Khalil AFP/Getty Images
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In an election that's supposed to be about the economy, tragic deaths overseas push foreign policy onto the political stage in the race between Mitt Romney and President Obama. While Romney seems to have lost the initial battle, questions remain about the administration's Middle East goals.

Join NPR's Ron Elving and Ken Rudin for the latest "It's All Politics" roundup.

Shots - Health Blog
12:53 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

How's Your Cholesterol? The Crowd Wants To Know

Members of the online community Track Your Plaque get advice from a doctor and each other on how to cook low carb meals.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 2:33 pm

Our impulse to share intimate details about our lives within our social networks (and even sometimes with complete strangers) seems to know few bounds.

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Monkey See
12:13 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Pop Culture Happy Hour: O Canada!

NPR

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 6:45 pm

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We taped this week's show with half of us in D.C. and half of us — me and Trey, plus NPR's own Bob Mondello — in a studio in Toronto. Why? Because of the Toronto International Film Festival, which provides the front half of the show. Trey, Bob and I talk about a bunch of the films we saw, many of which you can see covered on the blog's TIFF '12 section.

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Faith Matters
12:03 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

What Does It Mean To Be A Jew?

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 5:23 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now, we turn to Faith Matters. That's the part of the program where we talk about matters of faith, religion and spirituality. This Sunday night marks the start of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, and the beginning of what are known as the High Holy Days, for observance used, the most spiritually profound time of year.

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The Two-Way
11:00 am
Fri September 14, 2012

Did You Know? A Super Typhoon Is Heading For Asia

Super typhoon Sanba
Joint Typhoon Warning Center

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 10:58 pm

It's had top sustained winds above 170 miles per hour. It's got very low pressure. It is life threatening. And its cone of possible landfall includes Okinawa and the Asian mainland.

It's super typhoon Sanba, and it could strike the Japanese island by late Saturday night (local time) before storming on to China, South Korea and North Korea. Stars and Stripes writer Dave Ornauer says the storm's outermost bands are already hitting Okinawa:

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The Salt
10:10 am
Fri September 14, 2012

How African Cattle Herders Wiped Out An Ancient Plague

Scientist Robert Koch holding a post-mortem on an ox thought to have died of rinderpest, circa 1900.
Reinhold Thiele Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 2:45 pm

Twice in all of history, humans have managed to eradicate a devastating disease. You've heard of the first one, I suspect: smallpox. But rinderpest?

That's a German word for "cattle plague" a feared companion of cattle throughout history. When outbreaks occurred, as in Europe of the 1700s or Africa in the 1880s, entire herds were wiped out and communities went hungry. Now the disease is gone, eliminated from the face of the earth.

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It's All Politics
8:37 am
Fri September 14, 2012

Where Political Ads Go To Be Mocked

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 11:27 am

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The Two-Way
7:09 am
Fri September 14, 2012

Copts In U.S. Fear 'Terrible' Reaction In Egypt To Muhammad Film

Father Mina celebrates the Christmas Nativity Liturgy, the start of Christmas, at the Coptic Orthodox Church of St. George on Jan. 6 in Brooklyn, N.Y. Coptic churches around the country have witnessed a surge of Christians fleeing Egypt since the start of the Arab Spring.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 1:31 pm

The film Innocence of Muslims, which denigrates Islam and its prophet, Muhammad, has put the spotlight on a little-known community, Coptic Christians.

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Presidential Race
6:33 am
Fri September 14, 2012

Middle East, Economy Dominate Campaign Trail

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. Renee Montagne is in St. Louis today visiting our member station KWMU.

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney campaigns outside Cleveland, Ohio today. He's in a state that's widely considered essential for him to win - a state where recent surveys show him trailing President Obama by single digits.

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Education
6:32 am
Fri September 14, 2012

End Of Chicago Strike Near, But Questions Remain

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Friday, it's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. The teacher's strike in Chicago enters its fifth day today. We're told a resolution appears to be close. Nearly 350,000 students could be heading back to class as early as Monday. Even with an end possibly in sight - you're hearing all the qualifiers here, right - teachers still remain skeptical about changes coming to Chicago Public Schools. NPR's Sonari Glinton reports from Chicago.

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Economy
4:24 am
Fri September 14, 2012

Discouraged In Hunt For A Job, Many Stop Looking

A job fair was held at the The Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., last month. The U.S. unemployment rate declined in August in part because the number of "discouraged workers" climbed.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 11:43 am

The U.S. population is growing. In normal times, the labor force — working or not — would be growing too. But these are not normal times, and the labor force is actually smaller than it was four years ago, meaning millions of people who should be there aren't.

The reasons people drop out of the workforce are myriad. People go back to school. Others have health issues or family priorities that keep them from looking for work. But some stop looking because they are discouraged.

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U.S.
4:24 am
Fri September 14, 2012

California Online Sales Tax Faces Enforcement Hurdle

An Amazon worker sorts packages at a fulfillment center in Goodyear, Ariz.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 11:43 am

It's not hard to find online shoppers these days. Take the hipster cafe in San Francisco's Mission District where Shirin Oskooi opens her laptop and ticks off her latest Amazon purchases.

Next to her is Craig Sumner. He opens an Amazon invoice to see how much sales tax he was charged on his latest pair of Levis: none.

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The Salt
5:20 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

A Little Patience, A Lot Of Salt Are Keys To A Lost Pickle Recipe

There's more than one way to make a pickle.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 2:45 pm

Here's a new mantra you might consider adding to your list of daily kitchen chants: "It takes patience to perpetuate pickles."

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