The Old Man Of The Mountain

For generations, the Old Man of the Mountain gazed out from Franconia Notch, but fourteen years after its collapse, a listener asks if maybe it's time to move on? On this week's show, we investigate all the ways the granite profile that was, is still deeply rooted in the state's identity. 

Plus we'll report on what you had to say when it comes to a possible replacement, should the fateful day ever come when the state decides to change its official emblem.

Wikimedia Commons

Plans for a new, universally accessible trail near the plaza dedicated to New Hampshire's famous fallen icon, the Old Man of the Mountain, have run into some hurdles.

Wednesday marks 14 years since the 40-foot-tall granite formation resembling a man's face fell 1,200 feet to the ground. Since then, the Old Man of the Mountain Profile Plaza in Franconia Notch was dedicated.

Wikimedia Commons

Officials with the state parks department presented plans for a new Franconia Notch trail Thursday. 

The trail would begin near an existing viewing plaza, dedicated to the iconic, now-fallen, rock formation known as the Old Man of the Mountain.

  New Hampshire is planning a new, universally accessible trail near the plaza dedicated to its famous fallen icon, the Old Man of the Mountain.

Sean Hurley, NHPR

It was ten years ago Friday, that the state lost the Old Man of the Mountain. A celebration at Profile Park marked the anniversary.

  A lone bagpiper approached the shore of Profile Lake to set the tone of the morning. Throughout the ceremony, eyes and cameras hunted the jagged spot where the Old Man’s face once was. John DeVivo, General Manager of the Park said you can’t help but look: