PFC

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Portsmouth officials say six rounds of sampling done for chemicals in wells at what's now the Pease International Tradeport have resulted in non-detect levels since the city began using a carbon filter system.

Public Works Department deputy director Brian Goetz tells The Portsmouth Herald the last test was done on Nov. 15. He says all six tests resulted in non-detect levels for two types of PFCs, or perfluorochemicals.

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New Hampshire health officials say they anticipate that blood test results for residents whose drinking water supply has been contaminated with PFCs will be coming back in the weeks ahead.

The state Department of Health and Human Services says that the agency has received about 400 blood samples from people who may have been exposed to perfluorochemicals in southern New Hampshire and at the Pease Tradeport.

The Conservation Law Foundation is suing the Pease Development Authority over water contamination issues at the former Pease Air Force base in Portsmouth.

The Conservation Law Foundation says the Pease Development Authority failed to seek required federal storm water runoff permits from the Environmental Protection Agency.

Conservation Law Foundation lawyer Tom Irwin says the federal Clean Water Act requires the PDA to have a storm water runoff management plan.

Epa.gov

Residential water sources near a Superfund site on the Seacoast have tested below the state’s standard for perfluorichemicals - including PFOA. Earlier tests at the site showed PFCs at levels significantly higher than the state standard.

Sixteen residential wells near the former Coakley landfill were tested for perfluorichemicals following the discovery of those contaminants in monitoring wells at the landfill earlier this year. All of the residential wells tested showed PFC levels below the recently established state standard.

Jason Moon for NHPR

State health officials held a meeting in Portsmouth Thursday night to discuss the results of over 1500 blood tests from people exposed to contaminated water at the former Pease Air Force base.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Saint-Gobain is not the only company using perfluorinated compounds in New Hampshire. New Hampshire’s Department of Environmental Services has identified 44 companies in the state that likely use or once used this water-contaminating compound in their products.

Perfluorinated compounds include PFOA, found earlier this year at Saint-Gobain’s Performance Plastics plant in Merrimack, and PFOS, found two years ago in well water on the former Pease Air Force base.

EPA Superfund Records Collections

The federal Environmental Protection Agency has agreed to test water for possible PFC contamination near the Coakley landfill in southeast New Hampshire.

The Portsmouth Herald reports Gov. Maggie Hassan said it's her understanding that the EPA has committed to testing areas around the landfill in Rye and North Hampton and is finalizing a plan for such testing.

  More than 500 people showed up at a Merrimack Elementary School last night for the first public information meeting about a water contaminant found in private wells in the town.

There, the state’s Departments of Health and Human Services, and Environmental Services told the packed auditorium that the state would offer voluntary blood tests to the handful of residents whose wells test over a certain threshold. 

On Thursday, DHHS public information officer Jake Leon told NHPR "it's still early. It's hard to know what we're going to do."  

public domain / wikimedia commons

  A Kentucky-based attorney is criticizing the NH Department of Environmental Services for its response to possible water contamination in Merrimack.

The Department of Health and Human Services is offering a free blood test to people who may have drunk contaminated water at the Pease Tradeport in Portsmouth last year.

Perfluorochemicals, or PFCs, are used in products that resist heat – like Teflon, and the foam once used for fighting fires at Pease Airforce Base. PFCs were found in a well at the Pease Tradeport in May 2014.

State officials have shut-down one of three drinking water wells that serve the Pease Tradeport. The well was contaminated with an unregulated chemical found in foams used by firefighters.

Perflourooctane Sulfonic Acid, or PFOS, was found in the well which serves the 250 businesses and 8,300 employees of the Pease Tradeport. It was detected in levels that exceed a “provisional health advisory” level set by the EPA.