police

Two state police troopers have been arrested and charged with simple assault after an incident in May in which the troopers allegedly beat a man who led them on a chase northern Massachusetts and Southern New Hampshire. 

Attorney General Joseph Foster announced the charges Tuesday afternoon against Trooper Andrew Monaco of the New Hampshire State Police and Trooper Joseph Flynn of the Massachusetts State Police. 

 

Police in New Hampshire's largest city have gotten the Pokemon Go bug, trying to lure fugitives with the popular app.

A post on the Manchester Police Department Facebook page announces that police recently detected one of the more rare Pokemon characters — a Charizard — in the booking area. The post invites those whose names appear on a list linked to the post to be "one of the lucky ones" to come capture the Charizard.

The list includes the names of the more than 500 fugitives on the department's wanted persons roundup.

Allegra Boverman

  A few hundred gathered for a Black Lives Matter march down Elm Street in Manchester Saturday evening.

A Week of Turmoil and Violence: N.H. Perspective

Jul 11, 2016
TSCELEB NEWS / FLICKR/CC

New Hampshire reacts to the Dallas police shootings and what motivated them.  We'll get a Granite State view on the national debate over race, policing and guns.  We'll talk with those most involved -- from New Hampshire law enforcement....to minority community activists.....and get their ideas for a way out of this cycle of violence and turmoil.  


Chris Jensen for NHPR

  Police in Manchester are conducting a DWI checkpoint this coming weekend. 

Courtesy of the U.S. Senate

  Manchester's police chief says the city's officers will not be featured on the TV show "COPS" as originally planned. 

Paige Sutherland, NHPR

Both of the Manchester police officers shot and wounded while chasing an armed robbery suspect have been released from the hospital. 

The state is investigating whether police used an inappropriate amount of force as they took a Massachusetts man into custody Wednesday in Nashua. 

 

New Hampshire's governor is calling for a full investigation into the use of force by police after video surfaced of officers appearing to pummel a suspect who had led them on a high-speed chase from Massachusetts to New Hampshire.

News helicopter video of the police pursuit Wednesday showed Richard Simone, of Worcester, Massachusetts, stepping slowly out of his truck, kneeling and putting his hands on the ground before several officers rushed him.

TSCeleb News / Flickr/CC

With more attention to problems in police-community relations around the country, one change that nearly everyone agrees on in the Granite State is the need for more body cameras. We'll discuss a bill that proposes rules for New Hampshire law enforcement that may opt to use the technology, addressing questions of privacy, effectiveness, storage, protocol, and cost.

NHPR File Photo

The southeast New Hampshire town of Barrington has hired its first female officer since the police department was founded in the 1950s. 

City of Boston Mayor's Office / Flickr/CC

Departments nationwide and in the Granite State are struggling to attract new officers. With the career being seen as less rewarding than it once was, and police themselves under more scrutiny, some would-be recruits are hesitant to join the force.

Police officials say the New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council, responsible for training every law enforcement officer in the state, is in "financial crisis."

Capt. Benjamin R. Jean, PSTC support bureau commander, tells The Portsmouth Herald that there are two main reasons for the council's dire financial state.

First, Jean says, was the removal of millions of dollars from the PSTC's budget to put toward the state's general fund.

11.03.15: Snitching, Tig Notaro, and Cancer

Nov 3, 2015
Paul Robinson via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/ccYWqo

Snitches, rats, finks, and narcs – criminal informants may not be popular among their peers, but are crucial to the work of law enforcement. Today, the risks investigators face when it uses criminals to catch other criminals. Then, 2012 was a rough year for comedian Tig Notaro. She suffered a serious intestinal infection, the death of her mother, a major break-up, and the kicker, she was diagnosed with cancer. She explains why she chose to announce her cancer diagnosis to a roomful of strangers during a stand-up set.

Fines & Incarceration in N.H.

Sep 28, 2015
Peter Stinson / Flickr/CC

A new New Hampshire ACLU report says that too many Granite Staters go to jail because they can't afford to pay court fines. We're looking at how this system works and whether it needs to change.

GUESTS:

SoxFanInSD via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/pWJZT7

We think of Coca-Cola as the quintessential American soda – so why then are so many people embracing a foreign variation on the brand? We explore the myth of a healthier, more authentic brand of coke. Plus, a Millennial author comes up with a counter-intuitive theory about why 20-somethings are so obsessed with taking pictures of their food. And, a report on how and why local law enforcement agencies from Ferguson, Missouri to Keene, New Hampshire have stocked up on armored vehicles and other military gear.  

A number of New Hampshire cities and towns are taking part in this year’s National Night Out on Tuesday evening.

The annual events are aimed at building stronger relationships between law enforcement and the community.

Captain Mike Schwartz with the Portsmouth Police Department says that’s particularly important this year, as the state deals with the growth in heroin and opioid abuse.

 

Town selectmen in New Hampshire have voted to fire a long-standing police chief.

WMUR-TV reports the New Durham selectmen voted 2 to 1 Thursday morning to terminate Police Chief Shawn Bernier during a closed meeting at the Town Hall.

Selectman David Bickford says the board had a right to terminate without cause, according to the chief's contract.

Bickford says that Bernier wanted to retire and this decision will give him severance pay.

But Bernier says he only wanted to go part-time and that the town had no right to fire him under state law.

Rene Jakobson via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/4UoQ63

Just a few years ago, marriage equality seemed dead in the water. Now the players are running a victory lap. Today, we learn how gun control activists are now recruiting ideas and people from the gay marriage movement. Then, one of the most isolated communities in the world is about to become a lot more social when their first airport opens next year, but the change may not be welcome. And, summer vacation season is in full swing with tourists jet setting all over the world. But what happens when the place you’re visiting is in the midst of a global financial crisis? We’ll speak to a man traveling to Greece this week to find out how he’s planning to pack.

officer.com

New Hampshire’s largest police department has changed its policy prohibiting visible tattoos.

The move was prompted by an op-ed published by the wife of a Manchester veteran who questioned the policy, saying her husband couldn’t apply because of an army-related tattoo on his forearm.

Nick Douglas via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/eiCit

The New Hampshire Attorney General's office is releasing the names of dozens of police officers who were mistakenly told they had passed an assessment to administer a device that tests a person's blood-alcohol content.

The state Attorney General's office released 64 police officer names, their respective departments and dates of their false positive test scores.

Deputy Attorney General Ann Rice says the erroneous test results means any drunk-driving cases handled by these officers will be scrutinized.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

The weekday morning rush is in full effect at the McDonald’s in Concord’s South End. Customers are ordering Egg McMuffins at the counter; commuters are lined up in the drive-thru lane.

Oh, and nine members of the Concord Police Department are here, including Lieutenant John Thomas.

Courtesy The University Of New Hampshire

 Officials at the University of New Hampshire and the Durham Police Department say they’re ready if any end-of-semester parties get out of hand this week.

Tuesday is the reading day, a campus-wide study day ahead of the start of final exams Wednesday. It’s also Cinco de Mayo, and there’s warm weather in the forecast. Those factors have all served as catalysts in years past for heavy drinking parties that have brought riot police to downtown Durham.

Photo: West Midlands Police/cc/flickr

 

Selectmen in the town of Bethlehem have approved body cameras for police officers.

The cameras will be chest-worn devices that can record for five or six hours. Plans are for police to start using them in August.

The Caledonian Record reports that each of Bethlehem's seven police officers will have one for motor vehicle stops and dispatched calls. Individuals pulled over or stopped must be notified the camera is on.

Police in other towns have been using body cameras, such as Haverhill and Weare.

New Hampshire Debates Body Cameras For Police

Feb 18, 2015
West Midlands Police / Flickr/CC

The national conversation over police use of force sparked by the deaths of unarmed suspects in Ferguson and New York City has been marked by unrest and divisive politics. But in the midst of this polarized debate, there is one change that nearly everyone agrees on: the need for more body cameras worn by police officers. Before the new technology is widely adopted though, questions of privacy, effectiveness, and cost will have to be addressed.

GUESTS:

NHPR / Ryan Lessard

Manchester is the state’s largest city, and it’s also the most racially diverse.

In the wake of tensions between police and citizens in several large cities, the Manchester Police Department recently held a public forum to talk about policing in a diverse community.

David Mara is chief of the Manchester Police Department.

He joins Morning Edition to talk about the issue.

When you first talked about the idea behind the forum, you said you didn’t want to have a Ferguson in 10 years. What did you mean by that?

File photo/NHPR

Attorney General Joseph Foster says police were responding to a call from a woman just after 8 a.m. who said her husband had just left their home distraught, suicidal and armed with a shotgun. 

Police located his truck at a nearby intersection and the officer approached. 

The officer returned fire and the man suffered a single, fatal gunshot wound to the head. 

Authorities are withholding the names of those involved at this time. They say the officer involved did not sustain any serious injuries. 

An autopsy is scheduled for Thursday.

Around the country, protestors have been gathering to voice their concern over violence against black Americans by police officers. Last night, one of those protests was held in Hanover. (You can see photos of the protest here.)

Matt M. / flickr, creative commons: https://www.flickr.com/photos/41348459@N00/3457301638

  This week the Portsmouth police department launches a new program called “Cops on Corners,” in an effort to make department operations more transparent.

Deputy Police Chief Corey MacDonald says the community events are a response both to local tensions and a national conversation arising out of the death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. He says “the goal here is to get out in front of the public, go neighborhood by neighborhood --because different neighborhoods have different issues -- and just meet with people.”

Ferguson Decision: N.H. Reacts

Nov 25, 2014
Peter Snarr / Flickr/CC

We’re talking about the fallout in Ferguson. Protests broke out again last night after a grand jury decided not to indict Darren Wilson, the police officer who shot and killed teenager Michael Brown this summer.  We’re talking about the reaction in Ferguson and what this means for civil rights, police force, and race relations across the country and in the Granite State.

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