Politics

Credit Daniel S. Hurd

NHPR's political coverage from the New Hampshire State House to the First In The Nation Primary, Town Meeting, and the Congressional Delegation. Stories by Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers, Digital Journalist Brian Wallstin, and the NHPR News team. 

L: Chris R: Camilo Rueda López via flickr Creative Commons / L: https://flic.kr/p/hZL67 | R: https://flic.kr/p/7YY4d7

Most Americans know far more about the names of the royals than how British democracy works, but many Brits are closely following the presidential primary here in the U.S. On today’s show, The Guardian's man in NH gives us a British perspective on America’s election.

Then, between the paltry snow cover and spring-like temperatures, suffice it to say, this has been a very strange New Hampshire winter, and the unseasonable temperatures have put a dent in many winter activities. Among the hardest hit? Ice fishing. We'll get the fisherman's perspective on the winter that hasn't really started.

woodfin / Flickr/CC

The New Hampshire presidential primary celebrates its 100th birthday next year, and a new book chronicles those many decades, including lots of primary lore. It also examines whether the first primary really has as much power over the nomination process as many believe it to.

  This program was originally broadcast on 9/3/15.

GUESTS:

Group learning and collaborative skills are status quo in today's classrooms - which can be tough on introverts, especially when they're the teacher.  On today’s show, the high burnout rate for introverted teachers.

Then, politicians have a long and storied past with music, from Bill Clinton playing saxophone on late night TV to Mike Huckabee playing bass in his band Capital Offense. But perhaps the most perplexing display of musical...uh...prowess: Bernie Sanders' folk album.

The Stream: NPR's Live Blog from the Iowa Caucuses

Feb 1, 2016
Getty Images

NPR's live blog The Stream will bring you live news, photos and analysis from NPR's political team on the ground in Iowa and in Washington, D.C. It will open at 4 p.m. ET and be updated all night.

Get Caught Up:

What we're watching: Turnout. Caucusing is harder than voting in a primary. Both Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders lead by double digits with people who tell pollsters they will be participating in their first caucus. The big questions if all those people lining up for their rallies will turn out to caucus.

Courtesy of Darren Garnick

Whether it's a visit to the Red Arrow in Manchester, the Dairy Twirl in Lebanon, or  Howard's up in Colebrook, you cannot campaign for President in New Hampshire without taking in some local flavors.  On today’s show we’ll look at the Granite State's other political stronghold, the diner primary.

Then, after leaking classified documents, Edward Snowden has become the poster child for citizens’ rights to privacy.  But one group was actively rallying against government surveillance long before Snowden blew the whistle...librarians.

And we’ve got another installment of the 10-Minute Writer’s Workshop, Patti Smith shares her writing tips.

NHPR Staff

Every four years in New Hampshire, the presidential primary season is heralded by the flowering of lawn signs. And while yard signs are hardly the most innovative campaign technique available today, a new scientific study suggests these old-fashioned political tools can still have an impact.

City of Boston Archives via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/bnwScM

Labels get thrown around willy-nilly during primary season...among them? Progressive.  However candidates Clinton & Sanders use the term, its history is not so straightforward. 

On today’s show, the rise and fall of progressive politics. Then, from anti-bullying seminars to the dare to keep kids off drugs program, ushering a gaggle of students into an auditorium or gymnasium for an all school assembly is a time honored tradition. But sometimes the educational value of the message is questionable.

Keno Bill To Go Before New Hampshire House

Jan 18, 2016
Brian Wallstin for NHPR

  House lawmakers are set to take up a bill this week that would allow keno at bars and restaurants that serve alcohol.

Sara Plourde for NHPR

Brady Carlson hosts this run-down on the latest in Primary politics, including behind-the-scenes stories from reporters, tales and trends from the trail, and "only in New Hampshire" moments the rest of the country is missing out on.

On our first podcast of the primary, we look at the week's avalanche of political ads. Then, two seasoned primary watchers weigh in on the celebrities (and non-celebrities) candidates call upon in the primary's waning weeks. Finally, a public radio host who's interviewed hundreds of primary candidates shares her strategy to get them to open up.

The Tangled Business of Facial Hair in Politics

Jan 7, 2016

Fashion styles come and go, but facial hair on men hasn't entered the mainstream since safety razors came on the scene. Sure, some of our elected officials have held on to their whiskers, but Presidential beards and mustaches are a distant memory.

Opus Penguin via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/apu85t

In November, Paul Ryan stepped onto the floor of the US Capital sporting a beard, the first bewhiskered Speaker of the House in a century. On today’s show, has the beard boom hit Washington?  

Then, from Bill Clinton to Ben & Jerry--when campaign season hits, political surrogates come out of the woodwork. We'll find out who is stumping for whom, and why it matters.

We’ll also open the history books for a serious look at a surprisingly well-rewarded skill, with roots reaching back to ancient Sumerians: professional flatulence.

r. nial bradshaw via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/vsHTwa

No matter how polished, prepped, and put together he or she may be, every presidential candidate copes with an Achilles heel. On today’s show, we'll find out how Marco Rubio capitalized on reaching for the water bottle...again and again and again. Then, need a gift idea for the book lover in your life? We'll go beyond the best seller list for a sampling of the best overlooked books of 2015, including a collection of short stories from Kelly Link.

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Personal branding is a part of all political campaigns, but female candidates face different considerations. On today’s show, a look at what the evolution of Hillary Clinton’s name signifies for women in politics, and why she took on Bill's surname in the first place.

Then from Newton and the apple to the solitary genius of Darwin, the scientific world is rife with myths and legends. Among the most pervasive, that Galileo’s imprisonment was long and excruciating.  We’ll find out more about the origins of these stories, why they persist, and how they shape our view of science.

Leo Newball Jr. via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/6j8MRH

No matter how polished, prepped, and put together he or she may be, every presidential candidate copes with an Achilles heel. On today’s show, we'll find out how Marco Rubio capitalized on reaching for the water bottle...again and again and again. Then, need a gift idea for the book lover in your life? We'll go beyond the best seller list for a sampling of the best overlooked books of 2015, including a collection of short stories from Kelly Link.

Bernie Sanders, the Vermont senator and Democratic presidential candidate, stopped by New Hampshire Public Radio's offices in Concord Friday morning for a conversation with The Exchange

On the way up, Sanders offered a quick "elevator pitch" for why he thinks he should be president — and took a moment to mingle with a (very) young potential constituent.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers joins Morning Edition to talk about the politics to watch in the upcoming week. 

So Josh, in the wake of the Paris attacks just about every presidential candidate was on record weighing in on how to deal with ISIS, and on whether or not the U.S should continue taking refugees from Syria. But the person what may have made the most news in New Hampshire on that front was Governor Maggie Hassan.

Paul Chenoweth via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/5rmJLs

When it comes to stump speeches, presidential contenders want their words to resonate with as many voters as possible – which may explain why Donald Trump speaks to the public at a 4th grade reading level. Today, the strategy of simplicity. Then, they say charity begins at home - but can altruism go too far? We take a look at the complicated motivations behind the actions of extreme "do-gooders", and the strangely hostile reactions they sometimes face from the world around them.

Jeff Myers via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/5UcE7V

When it comes to stump speeches, presidential contenders want their words to resonate with as many voters as possible – which may explain why Donald Trump speaks to the public at a 4th grade reading level. Today, the strategy of simplicity. Then, from speech to song…later in the show we go behind the glimmering façades and dance numbers to examine how movie musicals reflect American culture.

Just days before the election of a new speaker of the House, lame-duck Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, made good on one last promise — that he'd try to "clear the barn" for his successor.

In one fell swoop, two thorny issues were crossed off the to-do list: raising the debt ceiling by next Tuesday and coming up with a budget agreement.

Tracking Presidential Candidates on Social Media

Oct 22, 2015
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

We're looking at the proliferation of political speech in this tumultuous presidential season, and its impact on voters.  We’ll examine how campaigns and voters are navigating this brave new world of media, including the vast and sometimes viral dimension of social media -- and explore its implications for our democracy.

GUESTS:

•  Lara Brown  - Graduate School of Political Management’s Political Management Program Director and an associate professor at George Washington University
 

Ventura County Democratic Party / Flickr/CC

From Adams to Kennedy to Bush and Clinton, our guest Stephen Hess says that politics as the “family business” is nothing new. In his book, he profiles eighteen of these political clans: how power passes on, how it can be lost, and why many Americans are so uncomfortable with this concept. 

GUESTS:

Heather Khalifa / Flickr/ CC

We're checking in with Political Junkie Ken Rudin about the top political headlines of the month.

GUESTS

  • Ken Rudin – host of The Political Junkie, a weekly radio show covering national, state, and local politics. He is an expert in U.S. politics and campaign history, and a former NPR political editor.

Here's Ken's most recent podcast episode, about the recently vacant Speaker of the House position.

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/hSyish

We’ve seen this dance before: presidential hopefuls stumping in New Hampshire. Today, we talk to the official candidate from the Transhumanist Party who says we need a new political party and new tactics for the issues of our time. Then, Jackie Robinson’s major league debut was an obvious, watershed moment in America’s troubled racial history. But we’ll look at a lesser known moment for American civil rights: breaking NASA’s color barrier and the story of the first African Americans in the space program.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

  New Hampshire’s US Senators continue to call for reauthorizing the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund.

Republican Kelly Ayotte and Democrat Jeanne Shaheen were among those last week who unsuccessfully tried to pass a 60 day extension of the fund.

Speaking on the Senate floor last week, Shaheen said there was a perception the program was primarily used to acquire federal land. She said most of the funding for federal projects was instead used on existing parks, refuges and conservation areas:

The candidates for mayor of Manchester will begin a series of six town hall events this week.

Mayor Ted Gatsas and challenger Joyce Craig will be on hand Thursday night at McDonough Elementary School for the first event. 

The candidates will take audience questions and give opening and closing statements. 

Craig and Gatsas are scheduled to participate in five more sessions during October. The dates for the events are set but some locations have not been announced. 

Town Hall dates and locations: 

Patrick Lanigan via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/7nCt6r

Donald Trump is praised as “authentic” because he speaks without a practiced politician’s filter.  Meanwhile, pundits knock Hillary Clinton for not putting on a good enough show of authenticity – so, what does that actually mean? And politics is not the only arena where the meaning of authenticity is open to interpretation - what about food? Today we take a look at the myth of authenticity – in politics…cooking…and the internet. Plus, forgery in the art industry is not rare - but a con artist who has been caught and never sent to jail is. We’ll speak to the directors of a film that looks inside the mind of the mischievous shut-in and skilled artist who donated masterful forgeries to more than 46 museums. 

Brent Danley via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/4jg4aG

Donald Trump is praised as “authentic” because he speaks without a practiced politician’s filter.  Meanwhile, pundits knock Hillary Clinton for not putting on a good enough show of authenticity – so, what does that actually mean? And politics is not the only arena where the meaning of authenticity is open to interpretation -- what about food? Today we take a look at the myth of authenticity – in politics…cooking…and the internet. 

matt2181 / Flickr/CC

This primary season, much of the attention has focused on the Republican side, given the many candidates and another upcoming debate.  But this weekend in New Hampshire, it’s the Democrats’ turn: at their annual state convention, the party’s presidential contenders are all expected.  We’ll look at the candidates and the issues.

GUESTS:

Emily Corwin / NHPR

When an event is billed as a  “Women for Hillary” rally, it’s not surprising candidate Hillary Clinton and Senator Jeanne Shaheen were more or less preaching to the choir.

9.06.15: War Plan Red, Liberland, & Mexican Coke

Sep 4, 2015
Alex Indigo via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/4eDBug

At 5,525 miles, the US and Canadian border is the longest and friendliest in the world, but the long relationship between the two nations is not without conflict. Today, a history of US-Canadian skirmishes and why a war between neighbors isn’t out of the question. Then, with immigration a focal point in the presidential primary circuit, a commentator takes a tongue in cheek look at the rarely talked about immigration crisis that’s playing out north of the border. Plus, one man’s dream to create a libertarian utopia on 3-square miles of mosquito-infested marshland.

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