Rewind

NHPR’S Rewind: Alternative Fuel Vehicles

Aug 1, 2017
mariordo via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/sybjF

Last month, NHPR’s Laura Knoy hosted an Exchange discussion on electric cars and their challenges. Interestingly, the worries and obstacles of alternative fuel cars discussed in this episode were also present in previous Exchange shows aired some 20 years ago.

NHPR’s Rewind: How Mental Health is Treated

Jul 24, 2017

Medical scholars have long researched and debated the best methods to treat people with mental health problems. A recent Exchange episode explored how the philosophy of wilderness therapy – the idea that camping in a natural setting can be a treatment for patients struggling with mental health problems. But when gauging the benefits of wilderness therapy, it may be useful to examine the success of more common methods used to treat mental health: medication and talk therapy.

NHPR’s Rewind: New Hampshire Town Life and History

Jul 11, 2017

On July 3, The Exchange took a closer look at town life in New Hampshire. Granite State towns are recurring themes for The Exchange. Three stories in particular caught our collective eye at Rewind as revelatory of our state’s diverse history.

“Our Nig: Sketches from the life of a Free Black”

NHPR's Rewind: Malice on the Internet - Then and Now

Jun 22, 2017
jacobfg via Flickr Creative Commons

Since the inception of the internet and the computer, society has been challenged with balancing technologies’ benefits and demerits.

On June 12, 2017, The Exchange held a discussion on cyberethics. This session discussed crimes captured on video and posted online. The program examined viewers’ and digital platforms’ responsibilities when coming across online crime videos; and how the excitement and potential celebrity status is an incentive for people to perform malicious acts.

iStock Photo

Child care in the U.S. is expensive. For a typical family, child care can take up to a third of the household income. For years, Democrats and Republicans have debated tax deductions, subsidies, and how to provide quality and reliable childcare for families of all income. With these problems and questions, it is useful to study child care models in other countries. NHPR’s The Exchange did just that on November 8, 1995 when it explored Italian methods of child care.

Courtesy Robert Granoff

For more than 50 years, Beatrice Trum Hunter wrote about food and nutrition. Before there was Diet for a Small Planet, or Moosewood cookbooks; and long before supermarkets carries organic foods, Trum Hunter was an advocate of natural food and healthy living. Author of nearly 40 books including The Natural Foods Cookbook, Gardening without Poisons and The Great Nutrition Robbery

We’d like to take a moment to remember former NHPR President and General Manager Mark Handley, who died recently after battling cancer. Handley will be remembered as the leader who transformed NHPR into a statewide network.

Courtesy Anastasia Massone via flickr/creative commons

If you look far enough back into American media, you’ll find no shortage of smoke filled offices, but as time went by, public opinion (in part due to scientific discoveries about the true hazards of smoke and second-hand smoke) shifted, and amidst the furor the popularity of cigarettes died down. In 1990, 73% of New Hampshire residents did not smoke, yet a bill that would call for more regulation regarding smoking in the workplace was still met with opposition.

Courtesy Sebastien Wiertz via flickr/creative commons

August 17th, 2016 marks the day that photographer Lotte Jacobi would have celebrated her 120th birthday. Internationally lauded, Jacobi’s work earned her the praise of many noteworthy figures in history, leading to jobs photographing international icons like Albert Einstein, Eleanor Roosevelt, and J.D.

Courtesy Quinn Dombrowski via flickr/creative commons

This August, NHPR’s Natasha Haverty and Jack Rodolico have been working on a series of stories covering issues that homeless New Hampshire residents are currently facing. Their work sheds light on aspects of life as a homeless New Hampshire citizen that many non-homeless residents don’t often witness.

In 1979, fifty New Hampshire residents came together to form a committee that would create the state’s own public radio station—Granite State Public Radio. A year after its incorporation, GSPR received $61,000 in planning grants, and filed an application with the Federal Communication Commission.

On August 4, 1981, WEVO- Concord signed on from a small studio on Pleasant Street in Concord, broadcasting on 89.1 FM.

This is what that sounded like:

Courtesy Bob Doran via Flickr/Creative Commons

At 19 years old, I am certainly a product of the digital age. All of my school writing pieces, from simple grammar assignments in elementary school to research papers at college, have been created, edited, and finished off on various computers. I can honestly say that I have never used a typewriter. In fact, I’m not entirely sure where I would find one, should I want to recreate the atmosphere of a 1980s newsroom that Robbie Hoenig evoked in her report about UNH’s purchase of new computers for their writing lab in 1987.

By Wikicali00 - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=30680721

For many people under the age of 25, the Steeplegate Mall in Concord, New Hampshire is a landmark of the city. But, its early days were marked by uncertainty. In July 1990, the mall opened with the goal of providing a convenient shopping experience for New Hampshire residents, without overshadowing the businesses and atmosphere of Main Street.

Courtesy Chuck Coker via flickr/creative commons

Long before Lin Manuel Miranda and Hamilton nudged us to remember that our nation’s past is neither dead nor inaccessible, similar efforts were being made in New Hampshire. After the Revolution, written by David Magidson and produced by UNH’s Theatre Education Program, dealt with New Hampshire’s legislative debate over the ratification of the United States Constitution.

Fred Palumbo, World Telegram staff photographer - Library of Congress. New York World-Telegram & Sun Collection

Northern New Hampshire is known for its beautiful mountains and hiking opportunities, or its ski areas that draw crowds from all over New England in the winter. However, the North Country is home to more than recreational resorts. Nestled in the heart of the White Mountains is a thriving arts community that holds poetry in high regard.

Courtesy Peterborough Open Space Committee

In 1987, Hiroshi Hayashi moved his restaurant “Latacarta” from Cambridge, Massachusetts to Peterborough, New Hampshire. After just eleven months in his new location, Hayashi had amassed a loyal following among the town’s residents. NHPR reporter Robbie Hoenig met with him to talk about his business and the emphasis he placed on natural food preparation.

Courtesy Julie Falk via flickr/creative commons

In 1990, NHPR language commentator Richard Lederer shared with listeners some of the 10 “Best-Stressed Puns” of 1989, as decided upon by the International Save the Pun Foundation. Take a listen to Lederer recounting what the International Save the Pun Foundation considered to be some of the best puns of 1989.