Severe Weather

Mount Washington Observatory

When weather observer Tom Padham answered the phone inside the Mount Washington Observatory at the summit around midday Thursday, it was 52 degrees -- inside.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

MONDAY Night update: The forecast calls for high wind gusts and drifting snow Monday evening, with a cold front sweeping over New Hampshire for the coming days.

The National Weather Service has a hazardous weather outlook for the region. A combination of strong winds and cold will mean a chance of dangerous wind chill values through the end of the week, the Weather Service says.

Intriguing: Top 2017 Science and Tech Stories

Dec 20, 2017
Allegra Boverman, NHPR

We discuss the top stories in science, technology, the environment and energy in New Hampshire in the past year.  From the eclipse that captivated the nation's attention to the biofabrication industry gaining steam in the Manchester Millyard, we look at top stories nationally and in New Hampshire, including extreme weather, solar power, and a bitcoin bubble.  Plus intriguing discoveries in outer space and in the human body.


Update, 2:30 p.m. - A small number of power outages have resulted from the storm. Eversource reports about 266 customers without electricity, as of 2 p.m. 

1  p.m. -- Snow continues to fall in much of the state, though the storm has turned to sleet and rain in the south-eastern part of New Hampshire. The weather  has resulted in numerous school closings and delays - as well as accidents.

Keith Shields; NHPR

In light of the recent hurricanes slamming the Gulf Coast and Southeastern United States, The Exchange spoke with Perry Plummer, Director of Homeland Security and Emergency Management, Jonathan Winter, a Dartmouth professor who has studied increasing precipitation over the last two decades in New England, and two engineers, Jim Gallagher, who specializes in dams, and Fred McNeill, who works in wastewater treatment, about how well New Hampshire is prepared for major weather events. 

Steve Hooper; The Keene Sentinal

Hurricane Harvey slammed the Gulf Coast last week, and it got us thinking: How ready is New Hampshire for major storms, hurricanes, and floods?

Perry Plummer, Director of the Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management for the New Hampshire Department of Safety, says the state has plenty of work to do to ensure our infrastructure can handle the kind of extreme weather events that are becoming increasingly common.

"We know more water is coming; we’re going to get these types of rain storms," Plummer said on The Exchange. "Obviously, I don’t think we’ll get a Harvey in New Hampshire, but we are going to get 10 and 15 inches of rain, and that’s going to challenge our infrastructure. We need to rebuild our infrastructure to protect our residents, protect our critical infrastructure." 

FEMA Officials Tour Flood Damage In Grafton County

Jul 6, 2017
Jennifer Shea via Facebook

Last weekend’s rainstorm did more damage than officials initially assessed. On Thursday evening, twenty local roads remained closed. 

By Wednesday, cities and towns in Grafton County had upped their flood damage tally from $4 million to nearly $12 million. Two state roads, 116 South in Easton and 25A in Orford, will likely remain closed through the coming weekend, although local traffic can access residences in the interim.

On Thursday, Federal Emergency Management Agency officials began a tour of storm damage in the state.

NHPR Staff

The National Weather Service has issued a severe thunderstorm warning for Carroll, Sullivan, Grafton, Belknap, and Merrimack Counties.

It has also issued a flash flood warning for Grafton, Hillsboro, Belknap, Merrimack, Sullivan, Cheshire, and Carroll Counties.

The weather will clear for tomorrow, with partly cloudy skies in southern New Hampshire, and scattered storms in the North Country. 

Highs tomorrow will be in the low 80s.

FILE

The White House will soon be sending federal dollars to New Hampshire to help pay for damage from March’s Nor’Easter.

Flikr Creative Commons / blmurch

Over the past century, heavy rainfall and snowstorms have grown more frequent and more severe in many parts of the U.S.—including the northeast—as a result of our warming climate. In a study published last month, researchers from Dartmouth College, University of Vermont, and Columbia University investigated exactly what those changes looked like here in New England.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

A major snowstorm is brewing just in time for April Fools' Day in parts of New England.

The National Weather Service says the coastal storm is going to bring heavy, wet snow to Maine and New Hampshire starting Friday and continuing through Saturday afternoon.

Meteorologist Tom Hawley says the "jackpot" is going to be 12 to 18 inches of snow in higher terrain between Nashua and Keene in New Hampshire. He says interior sections of southernmost Maine can expect 6 to 10 inches while lesser amounts are forecast farther north.

Via Youtube, posted by Earl Flanders

Northern New England is preparing for another round of wind. And it's going to be much colder this time.

The National Weather Service says 30 mph gusts projected for Saturday in Maine and New Hampshire won't be as strong as the 50 mph-plus gusts recorded Thursday.

But the wind will be accompanied by plummeting temperatures.

Derrick Coetzee / Flickr CC

The National Weather Service has issued a winter storm warning and an advisory as another storm approaches the Granite State.

The overnight storm will have a more severe impact in the eastern part of the state, with accumulations ranging from less than an inch to as many as ten inches along the seacoast.

For severe weather updates, tune in to NHPR on air or listen to our livestream right here.

Dan Gorenstein / NHPR

The National Weather Service says a Nor'Easter is set to hit New England tomorrow, including much of New Hampshire. It comes off a storm that brought snow, sleet, and ice to most of the state.

Meteorologist Justin Arnott says a good way to prepare for this storm is to clean up from yesterday's.

NHPR Staff

A winter weather advisory is in effect until midday today as the first nor'easter of 2017 continues to have an impact across the state, with nearly 700 schools and organizations closed for the day.

Scroll down for severe weather maps and resources.

A mix of snow, sleet, and freezing rain will continue to fall throughout the morning, with a transition to rain this afternoon.

Power outages are possible as ice accumulates on branches, and roads are expected to be slippery throughout the day.

Dan Gorenstein for NHPR

The National Weather Service has issued multiple advisories for the winter storm expected to reach the Granite State early Tuesday evening.

Scroll down for weather maps and resources.

Central New Hampshire is expected to get the heaviest snowfall, with predictions ranging from six inches in Concord to eight inches in the Lakes Region. First flakes will likely fall after 5 p.m., with snow continuing overnight and into Wednesday morning. 

A second round of snow could be heading New Hampshire's way late Wednesday night. 

Sara Plourde, NHPR

Increasing snowfall rates are expected across parts of New England into this evening, with snowfall rates upwards of 1-1.5 inches per hour possible across the region.

Later this evening, a more intense snowfall band may produce rates upwards of two inches per hour across portions of southern/central New Hampshire, and western and southern Maine.

A winter storm warning is in effect until 5 a.m. Friday.

AMS Archives / Flickr/CC

A new book by Stephen Long describes how this giant storm transformed the New England landscape and seared itself into the memory of its people.  We’ll delve into just how big it was, the wide-ranging impacts, including how the hurricane created public works projects and developed new thinking around forestry. We'll also talk about preparation for the next inevitable great storm.

  This program was originally broadcast on 4/11/16.

Flikr Creative Commons / blmurch

Update Sunday 7/24 11:30pm: New Hampshire electric utilities say they've restored power to nearly all of the homes and businesses who lost electricity during Saturday's storm.

It's really hot in most of the mainland United States right now. The National Weather Service predicts temperatures in the triple digits through the weekend in much of the South, Midwest and along the East Coast.

The culprit: a "heat dome."

It's a real meteorological event — the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration even took the time to define it in the agency's warning this week:

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Nearly all of northern New England is under a winter weather advisory this morning, with snow and ice making for difficult driving in many areas.

The Department of Transportation saw car accidents across the state this morning, but officials said incidents were clearing up as rush hour passed.

“With the morning commute being done, that’s helpful,” transportation manager Sue Page said around 9:40 a.m.

MrSchuReads via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/sfTDs

 

The Northeast is bracing for its first major snowstorm of the season, but it doesn't look to be a major storm in Maine and New Hampshire.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

Check this story throughout the day for storm weather updates.  Visit the National Weather Service forecast map to see detailed conditions in your area. 

Worried about a power failure? We've got links to utility outage maps on our weather resources page

Sheryl Rich-Kern

The first measurable snow of the winter season is expected to arrive in the Granite State Tuesday.

Snow will begin falling in southern New Hampshire by daybreak, and will spread northward into the early morning hours.

Click here for NHPR's Weather Information page.

Steve Lavoie with Hometown Forecast says southern New Hampshire will see the snow transition to a wintry mix and eventually all rain, while northern parts of the state will see mostly snow.

Updated, 1:20 a.m. ET

The National Hurricane Center's projections for Hurricane Joaquin in the past two days have incrementally moved the storm east. Now the government agency is saying the storm is likely to miss the United States altogether.

Some coastal flooding is still likely from the storm's surge, the hurricane center says, and unrelated rains could cause flooding in parts of the Carolinas and Virginia.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

A series of violent thunderstorms struck the North Country Sunday evening with the worst hitting Littleton and Bethlehem just before 7 p.m., said Michael Cempa with the National Weather Service in Gray, Maine.

“We were indicating fifty to sixty mile per hour gusts on our radar.”

Within minutes dozens of trees were felled, often blocking roads.

At one point one lane of Interstate 93 in Bethlehem was closed by a downed tree.

Nicole McGrath and her daughter were just trying to drive to their home in Bethlehem when one of those trees hit their car.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New England's epic winter is on pace to produce a corresponding number of insurance claims.

Thousands of homeowners are filing claims as they begin to repair the damage brought by a record winter. Successive storms dumped a record 110 inches of snow in Boston alone.

Local insurance agents and public adjusters — firms that help homeowners navigate the claim process — say they've been swamped with inquiries and are urging homeowners to be patient.

Via aburnscholarsfordollars.org

 Volunteers spent one of their weekend mornings shoveling snow from the roof of a school in the New Hampshire town of Auburn before more snow arrived.

Fire Chief Bruce Phillips says about 40 people showed up Saturday morning in what he called it "a great community event."

He says the roof of the Auburn Village School had been deemed safe but with more snow in the forecast — and the potential for heavy wet snow — crews started on Friday to remove the load.

Emily Corwin for NHPR

Power outage maps and info: PSNH (Eversource Energy) | Unitil | National Grid/Liberty | NH Electric Co-op

School and other emergency closings from WMUR

511NH real time traffic/road closure information

Can you safely take a storm photo? Email it our way!

Monday 11:10

Eversource (Formerly PSNH) outages have been restored, after a peak of about 2,500. NHEC outages had peaked at around 2,800 (including about 1,800 in Moultonborough) but are now down to about 400 remaining without power. 

Monday 9:44 a.m.

State Fire Marshal J. William Degnan is urging residents to clear roofs of snow and ice.  In a press release, the Department of Safety warns that flat roofs are not the only ones susceptible to collapse.

Buildings in Portsmouth, Seabrook and Hampton have been structurally compromised, and even collapsed.

According to the DOS, “buildings that can be considered most at risk are ones where the snow load is not even across the roof with large accumulations of snow and ice, buildings with large open floor areas, storage, warehouses, flat or low-sloped roofs and unoccupied buildings.”

Degnan also urges residents to do the following:

  • Clear roofs of excessive snow and ice buildup, being careful not to damage your roof along with gas and oil service to the building. 
  •   Keep all chimneys and vents clear to prevent carbon monoxide from backing up into the building.  Some vents, such as gas and oil heaters and pellet stove vents, may exit the building through a wall and are susceptible to being blocked by excessive snow buildup on the outside of the building.
  •  Keep all exits clear of snow, so that occupants can escape quickly if a fire, or other emergency, should occur.  Keep in mind that windows should be cleared to allow a secondary means of escape in case the primary means of escape is blocked by fire.  Keeping exits clear also allows emergency workers to access your building.

Monday 8:23 a.m.

Frigid temperatures and high winds will last through Monday, with scattered power outages being reported throughout the region.

For updates on outages around the state, click on the utility maps linked above. 

Sunday 5:29 p.m.

The snow part of this weekend's storm is over, but forecasters are warning that tonight will bring dangerously low temperatures throughout the region.

The National Weather Service reports that as blowing snow winds down this evening, very cold air will move into New Hampshire from the Northwest. This air will combine with strong winds to produce dangerously low wind chill values, which could drop lower than twenty below zero. 

Sunday 10:02 a.m.

According to the National Weather Service, the heaviest snow has ended across Maine and New Hampshire, but the winds are just beginning to blow.

Winds will cause significant blowing snow and lead to blizzard conditions for some areas. In addition, very cold air is moving in from Canada and will combine with strong winds to produce dangerously cold temperatures through Monday.

Sunday  8:28 a.m.

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