Juliet Marine Systems

An 18-person Portsmouth startup has built a futuristic stealth attack boat they are now shopping around to the Department of Defense. Caroline Winter with Bloomberg reports the Ghost, built by Juliet Marine Systems, will go for about $10 million each.   

Right now, a Ghost prototype resides in a hangar at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. There, CEO Gregory Sancoff told Winter the 4,000 horsepower aluminum and stainless steel vehicle is “such a smooth ride, you can sit there and drink your coffee going through six-foot swells.”

Go to StateImpact NH to read more and to trace venture deals across the country with our interactive map.

How to grow high tech in New Hampshire --- that’s a question a lot of people are asking these days.  Borealis Ventures, one of New Hampshire’s only venture firms, is teaming up with the state’s Business Finance Authority to get local capital in the hands of local innovators.

Every part of New Hampshire has been affected by the ups and downs of the economy, but not every region has felt the effects in the same way. That’s been especially true in New Hampshire's Upper Valley – when home prices were dropping and jobs were scarce, Upper Valley communities and employers managed to hold on… for a while, anyway.

Like the proverbial phoenix rising from the ashes, the new Center for Women’s Business Advancement seeks to build upon the foundation of its predecessor of supporting women entrepreneurs in New Hampshire and to go much further.

Part 2 of our Silicon Valley history series

Think of the most technologically innovative companies of the past 50 years, such as Intel, Apple, Google, Facebook and Twitter. Each company has a Silicon Valley address — and each one got backing from venture capitalists. Over the past decade, more than 35 percent of the nation's venture capital has gone to Silicon Valley startups.

High-tech and venture capital go hand and hand in the valley where technology and venture capital grew up together.

The first in a 3-part series airing this week on Morning Edition.

When Facebook goes public later this spring, its founder, Mark Zuckerberg, will be following in the footsteps of a long line of Silicon Valley tech entrepreneurs that includes Steve Jobs and Google's Larry Page and Sergey Brin. But there was a time when the idea of an engineer or scientist starting his or her own company was rare.