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While the debate about services like Airbnb is loudest in cities such as San Francisco and New York, it's also made inroads in less urban places like New Hampshire. We look at concerns over the lack of regulation, as well as the opportunities. Then, at the end of the hour, we'll discuss Uber, another major sharing economy company growing in the Granite State.


We can all remember our favorite sports movies – but what about our favorite sports-based books? On today’s show, Bill Littlefield of NPR’s Only A Game talks about his favorite sportswriters, and reads from his new collection of athletics inspired poetry. 

Then, we tackle another competition of sorts: passing the knowledge, the notoriously difficult test that every London cabbie has to take before he or she can get behind the wheel of a black taxi.

Plus a look at how and why the basketball shot clock came to be from Roman Mars’ podcast, 99% Invisible.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

  The ride-sharing service known as Uber will launch in Manchester Friday.

Uber users and drivers find each other using a smartphone app.

Manchester users will be able to get five free rides up to $25 until the end of the month.

Billy Guernier is the General Manager of Regional Expansion for Uber.

He says the average ride is roughly ten percent cheaper than a taxi in Manchester.

Several of the taxis taken off the road earlier this week in Manchester are returning to service.

Five of the 18 taxis grounded earlier this week have returned to service in the Queen City after undergoing repairs and inspections.

Problems with the vehicles ranged from broken tie rods and cracked windshields to rear brake failure and severe body rot.

Initially, cab company owners were unable to find a state inspector to recommission the vehicles, but city police helped locate an independent garage in Manchester for the work.