xandert / Morguefile


A federal judge has upheld a New Hampshire law the Libertarian Party argued could prevent its candidates from getting on the ballot.

Libertarians sued Secretary of State William Gardner last year, challenging new limits on how long parties have to collect signatures to petition their way onto the ballot. State law requires a third party to collect signatures equal to 3 percent of the total votes cast during the prior election. Under the change, parties can't begin gathering signatures until Jan. 1 of the election year.

Vox Efx / Flickr Creative Commons


A Concord non-profit is calling for greater voter participation and civic engagement in New Hampshire as it releases a study showing poor performance in both areas.

The group, Open Democracy, is holding a press conference Thursday morning at the Legislative Office Building to discuss the findings of a 9-month research project. The project measured areas such as voter registration and turnout, volunteerism, political donations, lobbying, diversity of representation and the competitiveness of New Hampshire elections.

Tracy Lee Carroll, NHPR


The New Hampshire Supreme Court has upheld a lower court ruling that struck down a 2012 voter registration law, saying language that links voting to getting a driver's license is unconstitutional and could discourage some people from voting.

The court, in a unanimous decision Friday, said because the language is confusing and inaccurate, and because it could cause an otherwise qualified voter not to register to vote in New Hampshire, it imposes an "unreasonable" burden upon the right to vote.

Kyle Flannery/USFWS / Flickr/CC

A bill proposed by fourth graders from Hampton falls was harshly debated and defeated in the legislature last month, leading to some late-night satire but also a conversation about the best way to get students involved in the democratic process. We’ll look at that and also examine bills this year addressing voter requirements.


New Hampshire residents have one more day to register to vote in the September primary elections.

Tuesday is both the last day for new voter registration and the last day those already registered can change their party affiliations. Undeclared voters may vote in either the Republican or Democratic primaries.

The primaries will be held Sept. 9. Candidates can start signing up to get on the ballot Wednesday. The filing period ends June 13.

cleOpatra via Flickr CC

Gov. Deval Patrick is preparing to sign a bill that would allow early voting up to 11 days before Election Day, making Massachusetts the 33rd state to allow early voting.

The bill would also allow online voter registration and let 16- and 17-year-olds pre-register to vote.

A final compromise version of the bill has been approved by the Massachusetts House and Senate and shipped to Patrick for his signature.

We look at what our nation’s most important document, the Constitution, says and doesn’t say about elections. There’s some debate over who should write the rules, the federal or state governments, also who exactly can cast a ballot and if voting is a right or a privilege.  We’ll talk with those involved in new civics program called “Constitutionally speaking”. 



League of Women Voters of California via Flickr Creative Commons

Next week, voters will take to the polls to elect the next president of the United States.  Watching the process will be a number of observers from all sides of the political process.

Pres. Clinton Criticizes N.H. Voter ID Law

Oct 3, 2012
PennStateLive / Flickr

Former President Bill Clinton is telling college students in the battleground state of New Hampshire that they have the right to vote either where they attend school or at home.

justgrimes / Flickr Creative Commons

A Strafford County judge says the Secretary of State must change voter registration forms before November’s election. 

The New Hampshire League of Women Voters and four college students sued the state after it released registration forms that seemed to say voters had to meet residency requirements.  But under state law, people who spend most of their time here for a defined period, like college students and military personnel, can vote without becoming residents.  League Election Law Specialist Joan Flood Ashwell says she’s pleased with the ruling.

The No-Votes

Sep 22, 2012

A new survey shows as many as ninety million Americans are likely to sit out this election.  They cite a number of reasons from “I’m too busy” to “my vote doesn’t matter”.  But in a tight election, these voters could have a profound impact on the outcome.  We’ll look closer at this group, why they feel the way they do, and the implications for our democracy.


David Paleologos - Director of the Suffolk University Political Research Center, which conducted the Unlikely/Unregistered Voter Poll with USA Today.

No Settlement Reached In Voter Registration Suit

Sep 21, 2012
Chris Jensen / NHPR

The New Hampshire attorney general's office says the state and two advocacy groups have failed to reach a settlement in a case challenging a new law that blocks out-of-state students from voting unless they establish legal residency in the state.

A superior court judge set a deadline of Friday for the state and the New Hampshire chapters of the League of Women Voters and the American Civil Liberties Union to reach a compromise.

Assistant Attorney General Richard Head says settling constitutional challenges is no easy task. He says the office will await the court's ruling.

Daniel Parks / Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire’s League of Women Voters could reach an agreement with the state soon on a controversial addition to voter registration forms.  This following Wednesday’s hearing in Strafford County Superior Court. 

The Strafford County judge has set noon, Friday, as deadline for an agreement.  The New Hampshire Civil Liberties Union, representing the League of Women Voters and four college students—recently filed suit against the state.

168,000 Voters Expected At Polls Today

Sep 11, 2012
Theresa Thompson / Flickr Creative Commons

It’s primary day, and despite an incredibly close race in the Democratic gubernatorial contest, many more Republican voters are expected at the polls. 

Historically, young people have been much less likely to vote than older Americans.

That trend has started to change in the past few presidential election cycles, especially in 2008, when a census report found that 49 percent of those ages 18 to 24 who were eligible to vote participated in the presidential election.


Sen. John Gallus, a Republican from Berlin who represents the North Country, was among 19 senators voting last week in favor of a new and more restrictive voter identification measure.

Senate Pulls Lever on Another Voter ID Law

Mar 21, 2012

Along party lines, the New Hampshire Senate today passed a second, more restrictive voter ID measure. Earlier this month, a bill requiring voters to show valid photo identification or sign an affidavit was approved with the backing of Town Clerks and the Secretary of State.

This new Republican-backed legislation would require those seeking to vote in New Hampshire to also register their vehicles in the State and apply for a New Hampshire driver’s license.

When Bill Dallas first heard that 15 to 20 million Christians in the U.S. are not registered to vote, he couldn't believe it.

"Initially, it surprised me. And then I thought to myself, 'Wait a minute, I'm not registered,' Dallas says. "Why wasn't I registered? Well, because I didn't think my vote made a difference."

Identifying Christians With Data Points

Democrats and Republicans don't agree on much. But they do agree that voter registration lists across the country are a mess.

A new report by the Pew Center on the States finds that more than 1.8 million dead people are currently registered to vote. And 24 million registrations are either invalid or inaccurate.

There's little evidence that this has led to widespread voter fraud, but it has raised concerns that the system is vulnerable.

New Hampshire lawmakers are preparing to vote on whether adults should have to show a valid I. D. when they vote at the ballot box.  Many other states are now considering these laws as well.  Supporters say it’s all about stamping out fraud, but critics call it an attack on a fundamental right of citizenship. Today we discuss the Voter I.D. issue.



State and local election officials get behind Senate proposal.

The bill would require voters to present a photo ID or be photographed to receive a ballot starting in 2016, but still allow those without an ID to vote. The bill’s author, Kingston Senator Russ Prescott, hopes his plan can forge accord on a topic that tends to produce partisanship.

"People will come to the polls, present their ID, and not be presented a provisional ballot if they don’t have an ID; they would fill out a affidavit and vote. We are working within the system that we have today."