water quality

NH News
10:23 am
Sun June 29, 2014

New Hampshire Beaches Get High Marks For Water Quality

Hampton Beach State Park got high marks in the new report.
Credit Josue Mendivil via Flickr CC

Three beaches in New Hampshire are getting high marks for clean water quality.

The beaches are Hampton Beach State Park, Wallis Sands Beach at Wallis Road, and Wallis Sands State Park beach.

The Natural Resources Defense Council put them at "superstar" status along with 32 other beaches nationally in its annual "Testing the Waters" report.

Officials say New Hampshire ranks second out of 30 states that are part of the EPA's beach monitoring program.

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Environment
6:00 am
Fri March 8, 2013

Coping With The 'Crazy Quilt'? Towns And State Revamp Shoreland Protection

Thanks to a strong conservation ethic, Squam Lake is one of the state's most un-developed large lakes. But development is starting to threaten water quality of many New Hampshire water bodies.
Credit Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Perhaps the biggest driver of New Hampshire’s tourist economy is clean water. Sparkling lakes sell boats, second homes, and jet-ski rentals. But keeping that water clean means smart development. As a new bill changing how the state protects shoreland works its way through the legislature, different New Hampshire towns disagree on what exactly smart development looks like.

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Environment
5:18 pm
Fri December 21, 2012

Legislators Will Take Up Great Bay Issues In January

Fertilizer running of from immaculate lawns in the Great Bay watershed is in the cross-hairs of one Newmarket lawmaker.
Credit Flikr Creative Commons / GrahamKing

Come January, New Hampshire lawmakers will consider a bevy of bills dealing with the water quality of Great Bay. Some proposals confront waste-water treatment plant costs head-on, while others skirt that controversy.

The decline in the ecosystem of the Great Bay, coupled with Portsmouth, Rochester, and Dover's decision to fight the EPA over required wastewater treatment plant to upgrades is inspiring action in Concord.

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Environment
10:36 pm
Tue June 19, 2012

Efforts to Restore Oyster Beds Could be a Stopgap Measure for Great Bay

Three-year-old oysters that were killed by one of two invasive European diseases
Sam Evans-Brown

 

The Nature Conservancy and the University of New Hampshire are working to restore oyster beds in the Great Bay. The organization hopes its efforts can help stave off an ecosystem collapse while towns in the watershed work toward upgrading their wastewater plants. 

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Tue May 1, 2012

Using Water Well

Last year, the Governor’s Water Sustainability Commission formed.  Their task: to ensure the quantity and quality of our state’s water is as good or better in the next quarter century. But with increases in population, greater pollution risks and  changes in weather patterns, it could be a tough task. We’ll look at the major aquatic issues facing the state and the challenges that may weight it down.

Guests

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Shots - Health Blog
3:15 am
Thu April 12, 2012

Water In The Time Of Cholera: Haiti's Most Urgent Health Problem

Marlene Lucien controls the hose that fills people's plastic buckets on one busy street corner in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.
John Poole NPR

Originally published on Mon April 16, 2012 12:40 pm

In the teeming city of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, millions of people have no reliable water supply.

Many of the underground pipes that did exist were ruptured by the 2010 earthquake. Many public water kiosks are dry.

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Environment
3:03 pm
Fri March 23, 2012

Great Bay Area Communities Sue State Over Water Quality Issues

Amy Quinton, NHPR

A coalition of Great Bay area communities is suing the state and the Department of Environmental Services, claiming DES failed to follow proper rules when determining water quality standards in the Great Bay.

Dover, Portsmouth, Rochester, Exeter and Newmarket claim DES violated state and federal law by not conducting a formal public process when determining water quality standards in the Great Bay.

As a result, the communities say they face unnecessary multi-million dollar wastewater treatment upgrades.

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