Youth

Shots - Health Blog
3:20 am
Mon April 16, 2012

Deadly 'Choking Game' Comes With Big Risks

Connor Galloway, age 12, was found dead in his bedroom with a belt looped around his neck. Connor's friends admitted to his mother that they'd been talking about playing "the choking game."
Courtesy of the Galloway family

Originally published on Wed April 18, 2012 8:48 am

Michele Galloway went looking for her son, Connor, one morning in their Webster, N.C., home to make sure the seventh-grader hadn't overslept.

"I opened the door and I found him," Galloway said. "And he looked like he was standing up beside his bed. And I just said, 'Connor, you're awake.' And then I realized he was not awake."

She looked more closely. "There was a little gap between his feet and the floor," she said. "And I realized, you know, he had a belt around his neck."

The other end of Connor's belt was looped around the top of his bunk bed.

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Law
6:14 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

High Court Debates Life Without Parole For Juveniles

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments on Tuesday in two cases that ask whether it is constitutional to sentence juveniles to life in prison without parole.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in two murder cases testing whether it is unconstitutionally cruel and unusual punishment to sentence a 14-year-old to life in prison without the possibility of parole. There are currently 79 people serving such life terms for crimes committed when they were 14 or younger.

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Law
3:11 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Without Parole, Juveniles Face Bleak Life In Prison

Charles Dutton is an award-winning actor. But as a juvenile, he wound up in prison for manslaughter and other crimes.
Andrew Kent Getty Images

We hear a lot about juvenile offenders when they commit a crime — and again, when they're sentenced to spend the rest of their lives in prison. But not much is known about what happens after the prison gates slam shut.

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Law
4:14 am
Tue March 20, 2012

Do Juvenile Killers Deserve Life Behind Bars?

Raphael Johnson shot and killed a classmate when he was 17. After his release from prison, he got bachelor's and master's degrees and started a community policing program in Detroit.
Courtesy of Equal Justice Initiative

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 3:18 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Tuesday in two homicide cases testing whether it is unconstitutionally cruel and unusual punishment to sentence a 14-year-old to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

There are currently 79 of these juvenile killers who will die in prison. What's more, in many states, the penalty is mandatory, meaning neither judge nor jury is allowed to consider the youngster's age or background in meting out the sentence.

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Giving Matters
12:00 am
Sat February 25, 2012

Boys & Girls Club of Manchester

Yawa Agbenowossi came to the United States from Togo, in West Africa, as a young child. She discovered the Boys & Girls Club of Manchester when she was in middle school. 

YAWA: Well, before I found the club, I just never took anything into consideration. I was never worried about the future. I found the club by a friend introducing it to me actually. She said that “you can come to the Boys and Girls Club” and soon enough I was coming there every day. They couldn’t keep me away from the club. That’s when I started to change.

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Word of Mouth - Segment
10:09 am
Wed January 25, 2012

“If you tell me yours, I’ll tell you mine.”

Photo by (cup)cake_eater, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

Produced by Chris Cuffe

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Digital Life
10:26 am
Thu January 12, 2012

A War To Watch: YouTube Takes On Television

Screenshot from YouTube

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Word of Mouth - Segment
12:36 pm
Mon January 9, 2012

Stealing their future...

Photo by Theein via Flickr Creative Commons

Thousands of foster kids are released from the system at age 18 only to realize that they are thousands of dollars in fraudulent debt. It can take years for any target of identity theft to restore their credit, and even longer to recover a sense of security. Former foster kids without family support or the benefit of experience or access to resources can be especially challenged.

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All Things Considered
4:16 pm
Tue December 6, 2011

Teen "Sexting" Not an Epidemic, UNH Research Finds

liewcf via Flickr/Creative Commons

Here’s a story worth sharing on your smartphone: new research says there is NOT an epidemic of teen sexting.

Janis Wolak is senior researcher at the Crimes Against Children Research Center at the University of New Hampshire. She’s co-author of two studies on sexting being released in today’s edition of the journal Pediatrics, and she tells All Things Considered host Brady Carlson the UNH data shows a rate of sexting much lower than the 20 percent number commonly cited in news reports.

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Giving Matters
8:35 am
Sat December 3, 2011

Court-Appointed Special Advocates of New Hampshire

Court-Appointed Special Advocates of New Hampshire provides advocates in court for children who are abused or neglected. Chris placed in foster care at age 16, was assigned a CASA worker to advocate for him. Antonia Andreoli was Chris’ advocate, and was a constant presence for him through the court and foster care process.

CHRIS: Through all the judges and foster parents and case workers and everything that I was dealing with, Antonia was the one person that was stable throughout my two years in the foster care system. I absolutely love her.

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Environment
10:51 am
Thu March 24, 2011

Urban Sprouts

A composite of the voices, poetry, and free-styles of young men who are residents in a youth detention facility located in the mountains south of San Francisco. The young men participate in a garden and nutrition education program with Urban Sprouts.

Environment
10:50 am
Thu March 24, 2011

Environmental Guilty Pleasures

Kellie Blauvelt and Devon Dennison

Some of us are well-meaning earth-lovers. We want to be model green citizens, but we don’t quite hit the mark all of the time. We’re not alone, as Devon Dennison and Kellie Blauvelt from Weekday High in Seattle, Washington, found out.

Environment
10:49 am
Thu March 24, 2011

A Little Flushed Up

Sara Zhang

Did you know that one in three people in the world does not have access to a toilet? That means environmental and health hazards that most of us wouldn't have thought of. Sara Zhang from Carmel High School's WHJE youth radio station in Carmel, Indiana, tells us more.

Environment
10:48 am
Thu March 24, 2011

From Cafeteria to Compost

Zoe Sheinkopf

We asked youth radio groups from Portland, Maine, to Seattle, Washington, to pick a product or a pastime and size up its green credentials. What they learned surprised us - like this piece from Zoe Sheinkopf from public radio station KUOW’s weekday high radio training program in Seattle, Washington. She followed the leftovers from a local university cafeteria to a distant compost heap to find out what becomes of all that waste, and to weigh the economic and environmental advantages of composting over just chucking garbage in the trash.

Environment
10:46 am
Thu March 24, 2011

Getting Real About Greenwashing

We're hearing from teens across the United States who are getting to the heart of what’s really good for the planet… and what just might look that way. Here’s one Maine high school student’s critical take on greenwashing, the corporate practice of making green claims about products and services that might or might not live up to their marketing.

Isaac Woodbury High is a reporter from Blunt Youth Radio in Portland, Maine, a youth radio program that hosts a weekly public affairs call-in show. Isaac took a look at Wal-Mart’s green initiatives and filed this story.

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