#OnlyInNH

Credit Sara Plourde / NHPR

Whether you’re a lifelong Granite Stater or a transplant just settling in, chances are, you’ve probably encountered a moment like this…

You’re driving along some stretch of I-93, or meandering through a trail in the White Mountains, or strolling through one of the hundreds of small towns scattered throughout the state, and you’ve noticed something that made you wonder: What’s up with that?

Maybe it’s been as simple as stopping to consider, “How did that statue get there, and what did that person do to deserve a statue in the first place?”

Or, “Why the heck do New Hampshire drivers seem to have so many vanity plates?” Or maybe it’s something a little more complicated — like, “How can the state afford to build so many liquor stores?”

No matter what you’re wondering, we want to know: What questions do you have about the quirks that make the Granite State, well, the Granite State? Send us yours, and we might be able to track down an answer. 

Large or small, silly or serious — all questions are welcome. And, chances are, yours could end up sparking a pretty interesting follow-up investigation. Sometimes the best stories are hiding in plain sight.

So, let's get started! Share your questions below... 

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Bill via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/2kFWk

One of New Hampshire's most sought-after animals is the moose - a giant mammal somehow able to straddle the line between majestic, and absurd-looking, with big blunt noses and comparatively spindly legs.

But beloved or not, moose aren't always easy to spot. This story from our Only in NH series sets out to answer questions submitted by listeners. This one is from Sean, who asks “Where is the best place to look for moose?”

Producer Taylor Quimby is on the case.

wine4food.com

It is that time of year when Honeycrisp apples are abundant, orchards are packed with families, and the leaves are just starting to turn. And one of the best ways to celebrate the onset of fall is indulging in New England’s seasonal food traditions.

But when it comes to regional foods, what is quintessentially New Hampshire, and what’s just New England-y? 

New Hampshire has long been graying. And without a major metro area that draws young adults, it can reinforce a stereotype of the state as that quiet, bucolic territory in the middle of New England.

With that in mind, one listener asked our Only in NH series: Why does Portsmouth shut down at 9 p.m.?

NHPR’s Jimmy Gutierrez stepped out for a night on the town looking for answers. It's a question often asked in some towns. But Portsmouth? Doesn't the Port City have a bustling night scene? 

All over New Hampshire, towns are divided into even smaller communities; Barnstead contains Center Barnstead, Barnstead Parade, and South Barnstead. There’s Conway, North Conway and Center Conway. Chocorua, South Tamworth, Wonalancet, and Whittier - are all part of the town of Tamworth.

This prompted a listener to our Only in New Hampshire series to write in and ask ,why are so many towns split up this way?

NHPR’s Molly Donahue found the answer to that question with a visit to Grafton.

Listen to the story:

mwms1916 via Flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/T2RUKY

As part of our continuing series Only in NH, in which listeners ask questions about the state and their communities, we sometimes hear from people much closer to our newsroom.

In this case, we got a question from NHPR's own Digital Director, Rebecca Lavoie. (And we should note, Rebecca's also a true crime author, so that may have influenced her curiosity!) 

She asked:

NHPR Staff

It's been fourteen years since the Old Man of the Mountain collapsed, but New Hampshire residents are still used to seeing him all over the state. One of listeners is asking, "Why?"

As part of our series Only in NH, in which we answer questions from around the state about New Hampshire oddities, producer Taylor Quimby tries to get to the bottom of that question.

New Hampshire Department of Transportation

In our continuing Only in New Hampshire series, we answer your questions and explore your state. Today, producer Hannah McCarthy find an explanation for what may be the state's most perplexing intersection.

Via NH DOT Facebook page

As part of our continuing series Only in New Hampshire, we're answering questions posed by Granite Staters about their communities. Producer Hannah McCarthy answered this one:

Samer asks: "Why is there no exit 21 on I-93 North?"

Via the NH Division of Historical Resources

As part of our continuing series Only in New Hampshire, we're answering questions posed by Granite Staters about their communities. Producer Molly Donahue tackled this one:

"Is it true the NH Division of Historic Resources has a secret list of archaeological site locations to protect them from looting and development?"

The short answer? Yes. (Sort of.)


Via the NH State Parks Blog

When we started asking for questions from our listeners about the state, we got pages and pages of submissions online; so many we couldn’t answer them all. 

So I combed through and picked one that sounded interesting to me. And that’s how I ended up calling a woman named Jen, and asking one of the stupidest questions I’ve ever asked.

NHPR/Hannah McCarthy

Ever walk past a private driveway with no end in sight and wonder... what's down there? Or glimpse a building through some trees and wish you could get up close?

Well, one listener wrote in about a place that she'd never seen... only heard of in passing. A place tucked into the trees in the Great North Woods. A New Hampshire institution. And chances are, you've never seen it either. 

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Just how far will some New Hampshire residents go to get out of their annual car inspections? Recall this local news report, from just a few months ago: “Police in Alexandria say they busted a woman who made a fake inspection sticker with an unusual item – a cheese wrapper.”

Drastic measures, maybe. But have you ever wondered what’s behind this law to begin with? For the latest installment in our new Only in New Hampshire series, we tried to get to the bottom of it.

NHPR/Sara Plourde

The woods of New Hampshire are scattered with signs of civilization: crumbling foundations, railroad spikes, scraps of unidentifiable metal.

Find enough of these in one place, and you're probably looking at a ghost town - a place people once called home, and have long-since abandoned. 

Taylor Quimby for NHPR

If you’ve visited the grocery store beer aisle lately, you might have noticed a growing number of beer options, many of them brewed right here in New Hampshire.

These hoppy IPAs, porters, and session ales are all part of the craft beer movement.

GIPHY

Remember how we asked you to send us your questions about New Hampshire? You delivered, and then some — and now, we’re happy to report, we have some answers.

AFV Pets, GIPHY

Are you due for an auto inspection? Would you mind if we tagged along? (It’s for a story, we promise.)

Update: Thanks to all who weighed in! More than 400 of you cast your votes, and we'll let have more details soon on the winning question and our plans from here. In the meantime, make sure to keep sending your questions our way here.