Brady Carlson

Reporter and Host, Weekend Edition

Brady Carlson’s latest role at NHPR is actually two roles: reporting for NHPR’s news team, while also hosting Weekend Edition on Saturdays and Sundays.

It’s the latest stop on an NHPR career that has included a little bit of everything since he joined the station in 2005. As NHPR’s webmaster, he led NHPR.org's expansion into an Edward R. Murrow award-winning platform for online discussions and multimedia content, and he launched many of NHPR’s Facebook pages and Twitter feeds, as well as the station's Public Insight Network.

While serving as All Things Considered host for four years, he interviewed presidential hopefuls, authors, state lawmakers and other notable Granite Staters, while helping to add weekly segments such as Foodstuffs, Granite Geek and New England Snapshot. He’s guest hosted The Exchange, served as a frequent guest on Word of Mouth and helped to anchor NHPR’s election and primary night coverage.

In addition to his NHPR work, Brady is finishing up his first book, a tour of the gravesites of the U.S. presidents, which is set for publication in 2016.

Brady holds a Master’s Degree in Visual and Media Arts from Emerson College in Boston and a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Social Science from Benedictine University in Lisle, Illinois. He and his wife, Sonya, live in Concord with their sons Owen and Wyatt.

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Luca Nebuloni via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/LZ7gR

A lot of what you see at presidential primary events is pretty standard: a national political figure, local officials, members of the press, and, of course, voters.

On this night at the Snowshoe Club in Concord, there was something else: a long table with sixteen pies.

The guest of honor, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, says he mostly adheres to a paleo diet, which doesn’t include baked goods. But in the spirit of the evening, he dug into a slice of blueberry pie – and the potential 2016 candidate had no regrets over indulging.

Brady Carlson, NHPR

The House Ways and Means committee has narrowly voted to recommend passage of a bill to authorize casinos in New Hampshire.

Before the 11 to 10 vote, committee members exchanged arguments familiar to anyone who’s followed casino debates in the past. Backers like Republican Gary Azarian of Salem said that, in addition to boosting jobs and economic growth, casinos would give the state revenue to fund its priorities without increasing taxes or fees.

Foreclosure sign
Jeff Turner via Flickr/CC 2.0 - http://ow.ly/LV7pt

HomeHelpNH, a state initiative to prevent foreclosures, says it’s helped about 750 households over the past two years. And state officials say there are many other households still working through the counseling process.

Scott Coultas via Flickr CC

As warmer weather has moved into New Hampshire, most of the state's more than 30 ski resorts have already closed. But Loon Mountain, Cannon Mountain and Mount Sunapee will stay open Saturday and Sunday, Bretton Woods will remain open through Monday, and Wildcat Mountain is planning to offer daily skiing through April 26.

Molly Mahar at Loon Mountain says this ski season only really hit its peak in the spring, well after the more traditional high points such as Christmas, New Year’s and Presidents Day.

Ze-ev Barkan via Flickr CC

New Hampshire will likely become the first state to repeal laws allowing employers to pay workers with disabilities at a rate lower than the minimum wage.

The bill passed this week by the House not only does away with a provision allowing employers to pay people with disabilities below minimum wage in most circumstances, but it also bans so-called sheltered workshops.  That’s when an organization sets up a workplace aimed at people with disabilities.

Brady Carlson

The CEO of Segway Inc. says the personal transportation device maker plans to stay in New Hampshire after being acquired by a Chinese firm.

moniff.org

In recent years America has marked 50 years since a number of key moments in the civil rights movement. The March on Washington. The murder of Medgar Evers. The Bloody Sunday at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma.

This year marks a half century since a killing that hits closer to home.

Jonathan Daniels, a native of Keene, New Hampshire, was killed in the summer of 1965. And Keene State College is holding a series of events this year about Daniels’ life and legacy.

New Hampshire Employment Security

New data shows New Hampshire’s seasonally adjusted jobless rate held steady at 3.9 percent in March, but that doesn’t mean there haven’t been changes in the state’s labor market.

Economist Annette Nielsen with New Hampshire Employment Security says there’s more movement among those with jobs and those seeking them. “When there’s more employment opportunities," Nielsen said, "you see a tendency of more people that have been sitting kind of on the fringes joining back in. And that’s what we’re seeing right now.”

Natalia Curtiss via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/LBtNR

It was 1623 when European settlers established their first fishing colony in the area around the Piscataqua River.  That was nearly 400 years ago – and yet the period between then and now is just a small part of the human history of the area we now call New Hampshire.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

Life on New Hampshire’s Isles of Shoals isn’t always the same as it is for those of us on the mainland. But a solar energy project there may point the way toward the future of energy all over the region.

K Hardy via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/L97SE

There's a spring tradition that's been building over the last few years: Peeps diorama contests. Participants use those marshmallow birds and bunnies to put together all kinds of wacky and creative displays.

Werner via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/L36Ox

It’s time to talk about cats.

Yes, it’s hard to believe that in the internet era, where Grumpy Cat and Keyboard Cat have become celebrities, and seemingly every third item we see on Facebook is a cat video, that we’d need to spend more time on felines.

NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center.

A Dartmouth astrophysicist is part of a team that’s been looking billions of years into the universe’s past – and they’ve found some clues that may explain why galaxies form the way they do.

Ryan Hickox is an assistant professor of physics and astronomy. The findings of his team were published in the journal Nature. Ryan Hickox joined All Things Considered with more on the findings.

 

Rob_ / Flickr CC

Recently Eversource Energy, formerly known as PSNH, announced it would sell off its power plants. That would make New Hampshire’s electricity suppliers separate from its electricity producers - at least for a while. A new bill in front of the State House would make it easier for electric utilities to own what are called “distributed energy resources,” which refers primarily to solar power.

Ben Hudson via Society for Protection of NH Forests

Last week, 12 deer were found dead in South Hampton. On Tuesday New Hampshire Fish and Game announced the cause of those deaths: feeding by humans.

Dan Bergeron is a deer project leader with New Hampshire Fish and Game. He joined All Things Considered with more on what happened.

 What were these deer fed, and why was that bad for them?

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Kentucky US Senator Rand Paul is in New Hampshire again. He's one of a number of Republicans considering a presidential bid for 2016.

He spoke with All Things Considered following an event in Manchester.

 

Stanley Zimny via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/KsGVQ

The idea of building a road is pretty straightforward – you build a path and let vehicles go on the path.

The reality is, of course, is way more complicated. How many lanes does the road need, and in which directions? Which signs are necessary – and which are distracting? Does the road make it too hard for vehicles to get through – or can it actually be too easy?

Bill Abbott via Flickr CC

Big changes in the economy are often followed by social changes. One such change is in how married couples manage the work of caring for their children.

Kristin Smith is a family demographer at the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire. She joined All Things Considered to talk about her recently published research on the number of married fathers providing child care.

Don O'Brien via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/JJrqM

For people, winter has pros and cons - but for cars, this kind of weather is not ideal.

David Brooks writes the weekly Granite Geek science column for the Nashua Telegraph and GraniteGeek.org. He spoke with All Things Considered about the effects of road salt on cars in winter - and the simple and not-so-simple ways we might stop those effects before they start.

 

Governor Maggie Hassan and the New Hampshire Writers' Project announced the four inaugural inductees to the New Hampshire Literary Hall of Fame Wednesday. The Hall of Fame will be housed as a permanent exhibit and artifact collection at SNHU's Learning Library on the school's Hooksett campus.

Writers' Project Board President Rob Greene and SNHU's Dean of the Shapiro Library, Kathryn Growney, stopped by NHPR's studio to talk about the inductees and the New Hampshire Literary Hall of Fame.

Alexey Kljatov via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/JBzMe

After spending weeks and weeks surrounded by snow piles that are several feet high, it’s easy to forget that those huge piles are made of tiny snowflakes. And no two snowflakes are alike – or at least that’s what we’ve all heard.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Florida US Senator Marco Rubio is in New Hampshire today. It’s part of a two day visit that’s largely seen as an early campaign trip of sorts by a political figure hoping to win the Republican Party’s presidential nomination in 2016.

Rubio has made a number of moves ahead of an expected presidential bid – he’s hired staff in New Hampshire, and he’s also used his political action committee to donate money to state and local officials and candidates, in this state and others that hold early primaries and caucuses.

courtesy Black Agnes

The debut album by Seacoast-based Black Agnes is called "Mason Jar of Home." Each song explores a different perspective of what home means - where you're born, where your ancestors lived, or even a moment in time.

Frontman Mike Dunbar joined All Things Considered to talk about the band, the concepts at work on the album, and the questions they might explore in a follow-up project.

Ibew Fairpoint via Flickr CC

New Hampshire FairPoint workers who have been on strike since October will vote on a new labor agreement Saturday. Ratification meetings will take place in both Manchester and Portsmouth.

Vermont workers cast their on Friday; Maine workers will follow suit on Sunday.

The new agreement comes after more than a month of negotiations led by a federal mediator.

 

Union representatives say ratification of the contract will be announced Sunday night. If successful, more than 1,700 striking workers could be back to work as early as next week.

courtesy Investing In Communities Initiative

There’s lots of discussion these days among public policy leaders and government officials about poverty – what causes it, and what can be done about it.

A new study aims to answer a different question – what are our perceptions of poverty, and what do those tell us about how to deal with the issue? Melissa Bernardin is director of the new Investing in Communities Initiative, which commissioned the research. She joined All Things Considered with more on the research.

Carol Robidoux for NHPR

With less than a year to go before the 2016 New Hampshire primary, the Granite State is starting to see more and more visits from potential hopefuls – so far mostly on the Republican side.

Matt Saunders via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/IzBvo

Over the next few weeks Foodstuffs is going to look at the range of foods we have here in the Granite State - and it may be a wider range of foods than many of us think.

Among winter comfort foods, Susan Laughlin of New Hampshire Magazine has one choice for the ultimate: poutine. She compiled a guide to poutine in New Hampshire and she joined All Things Considered to talk about it.

Sean Hurley, NHPR

Each year the New Hampshire Maple Producers Association honors the state’s best maple producer with the Lawrence A. Carlisle Memorial Trophy.

This year’s winner is the Fadden family, which has been making syrup for some 200 years, and has been producing on its current location in North Woodstock since the 1930’s.

Jim Fadden joined All Things Considered to talk about the award and the sweet old world of maple.

northeast naturalist via Flickr Creative Commons

How's this for a typical day at the office: get into a helicopter, fly just above treetops in parts of northern New Hampshire, and find moose to tag, track and monitor. It's part of the work New Hampshire Fish and Game is doing to study the effect of winter tick and other parasites on the state's moose population.

Mark Turnauckas via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/HR2Y2

The Super Bowl is still some time away, but there's plenty of competition taking place in New Hampshire - most notably the Rock, Paper, Scissors tournament at the Derryfield School on Sunday, January 25th.

To get a preview, All Things Considered talked with Ben Dougherty, Head of Upper School at Derryfield, and Jack Miron, a Derryfield sophomore who's organizing the tournament.

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