Brady Carlson

Reporter and Host, Weekend Edition

Brady Carlson’s latest role at NHPR is actually two roles: reporting for NHPR’s news team, while also hosting Weekend Edition on Saturdays and Sundays.

It’s the latest stop on an NHPR career that has included a little bit of everything since he joined the station in 2005. As NHPR’s webmaster, he led NHPR.org's expansion into an Edward R. Murrow award-winning platform for online discussions and multimedia content, and he launched many of NHPR’s Facebook pages and Twitter feeds, as well as the station's Public Insight Network.

While serving as All Things Considered host for four years, he interviewed presidential hopefuls, authors, state lawmakers and other notable Granite Staters, while helping to add weekly segments such as Foodstuffs, Granite Geek and New England Snapshot. He’s guest hosted The Exchange, served as a frequent guest on Word of Mouth and helped to anchor NHPR’s election and primary night coverage.

In addition to his NHPR work, Brady is finishing up his first book, a tour of the gravesites of the U.S. presidents, which is set for publication in 2016.

Brady holds a Master’s Degree in Visual and Media Arts from Emerson College in Boston and a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Social Science from Benedictine University in Lisle, Illinois. He and his wife, Sonya, live in Concord with their sons Owen and Wyatt.

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When you think of the places that have shaped technology the most, you might think of the garage where Apple’s Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak put together their first personal computers. You might think of the buildings at Harvard where Mark Zuckerberg started building a social website then known as “The Facebook.” Or you might think of the facilities in Washington state where Microsoft made billions selling its Windows operating system.

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A growing number of Americans are doing their jobs outside the usual confines of the office. And that includes doctors – the multi-billion dollar telemedicine industry is opening up new avenues for patients and for providers in New Hampshire.

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Now that New Hampshire has a law allowing for the use of medicinal marijuana, it might not surprise you to find advertisements about how people can obtain registration cards for the program.

There’s only one catch: there is no such registration card as of yet, and that raises some serious questions about those advertisements and who’s behind them.

  The New Hampshire Fisher Cats hold their home opener tonight in Manchester. It's the 10th season of a team that was originally supposed to be called The New Hampshire Primaries. That plan changed dramatically thanks to a group of vocal and mobilized Granite Staters. To remind us what happened, we talk with Vin Sylvia, the deputy managing editor for sports at the New Hampshire Union Leader. Ironically, the current name was selected through a democratic process not unlike the actual Primaries.


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Running a business that puts its profits into nonprofits isn't new - but the most common business we see is usually a thrift store.

A new coffeeshop in Manchester, called City Cafe, is using food and drink to boost nonprofit groups.

Massive open online courses are one of the big ideas these days in higher education – free college level courses in which anyone with enough time and a decent Internet connection can participate.

And as people have taken part in MOOCs, as they’re called, we’ve learned a lot about what works – and what doesn’t – when it comes to this style of learning.

Dartmouth College - that hallowed, prestigious Ivy League institution of higher learning - is now home to a food truck.

It's known as The Box, and it will serve Mediterranean-style sandwiches, salads and other foods, while giving students at the Tuck School of Business a chance to manage and operate a private, for-profit business.

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Describing the virtual currency Bitcoin can be challenging. Sometimes the more questions you ask, the more complicated it sounds.

Public health officials have a problem. They want more parents to get their kids vaccinated, because there's been a resurgence of dangerous diseases as vaccination rates have dropped.

Public Service of New Hampshire is an energy utility – but it’s about to try an experiment in psychology, which it hopes might prompt consumers to use less electricity.

It's known as "nudging," and to explain how it works we turn to David Brooks, who writes the weekly GraniteGeek science column for the Nashua Telegraph and GraniteGeek.org.

February 28th marks thirty years since the 1984 New Hampshire presidential primary. The ’84 election is often overlooked today – mostly because the general election saw Republican President Ronald Reagan beat Democrat Walter Mondale in a landslide - and yet, the 1984 primary was fairly influential.

Small businesses looking to scale up sometimes use what are called incubators – spaces that give them access to additional expertise or resources without having to take on a lot of additional cost.

New Hampshire is home to a food business incubator. It’s called Creative Chef Kitchens in Derry, and owner and founder Neelima Gogumalla joins All Things Considered host Brady Carlson to talk about it.

Tai Viinikka, courtesy Flickr

For some time now in New Hampshire, consumers and businesses who install and use solar panels have been able to earn refunds for the power they generate and return to the electric grid. This is known as “net metering.”

A state law passed last year makes it possible for some consumers to participate in net metering and earn refunds without having their own solar arrays.

This week the James Beard Awards recognized three Granite Staters in their list of semifinalists, two of whom are in the category for Best Chef Northeast.

Keene State College president Anne Huot says her focus since starting in the position last summer has been on listening – hearing what’s been on the minds of students, faculty and staff, business and community leaders and public officials.

Anne Huot joins All Things Considered host Brady Carlson to talk about some of what she’s heard and what she hopes to bring to Keene State in the coming years.

peanuts
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Today’s weather is yet another reminder that spring is still a ways away, but Nashua is playing host this week to a Science Café discussion about something we often associate with spring: allergies.

Brady Carlson, NHPR

Snow has been falling across New Hampshire again, the latest winter storm in a season that’s been full of them.

There’s a winter storm warning in effect for southern and eastern parts of the state, and a winter weather advisory for the rest of the state.

Many schools canceled classes again today; others planned early dismissals.

The heaviest snow has been falling Tuesday afternoon, ahead of the commute home. State Police said drivers should travel no faster than 45 miles per hour.

Meteorologist Gary Best of Hometown Forecast Service tells All Things Considered host Brady Carlson the winter storm system is moving north through New Hampshire Thursday evening, with snow expected to wrap up during the day Friday.

A professor at the University of New Hampshire who studies school violence says teaching our students civility and empathy can help make schools safer for kids.

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We have a lot of snow on the ground these days in New Hampshire. And judging by this week’s weather forecast, the snow piles aren’t likely to get any smaller in the immediate future.

Susanna Bolle / Flickr Creative Commons

Earlier this week New Hampshire’s contra dance community said goodbye to one of its most celebrated musicians and writers.

Bob McQuillen died Tuesday following a stroke. He was 90 years old.

McQuillen - sometimes called “Mac” or “Mr. Mack” – Among those contribitions: writing thousands of tunes. And as he noted on NHPR in 2002, many of them were written for – and named for - individuals:

Governor Maggie Hassan's first State of the State Address touched on a wide range of issues, including energy, infrastructure, and  education.

But the biggest news of the speech was a deal to expand the state’s Medicaid program, announced by Senate President Chuck Morse and Senate Democratic Leader Sylvia Larsen shortly before the governor's address. 

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/dougtone/5569497682/in/photostream/" target="blank">dougtone</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

It’ll likely be several more weeks before most of New Hampshire's syrup producers boiling their sap into maple goodness, but there are big ideas and changes in the air these days around syrup production, from new grading standards for syrup-producing states and Canadian provinces, to research on sap that suggests syrup could be produced in a way that's something akin to a row crop. 

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Nashua is in the midst of a downtown branding campaign, with the slogan “Dare To Begin” and an eye-catching video showing some of the district’s most prominent features from above, courtesy of a camera mounted on an unmanned aerial vehicles, or a drone.

The catch is, the system used to make the video does not appear to have had license from the Federal Aviation Administration to fly.

The last winter storm we followed closely decided not to come through New Hampshire, and instead dropped heavy snow in Massachusetts and other parts of the Northeast.

But Gary Best of Hometown Forecast Services says we're not going to miss this one. "This is going to be a definite snow event," he says. "The heaviest snow will across central and especially into southern New Hampshire."

A doctor's office
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Bringing a child into a world means making a lot of decisions – getting the baby’s room ready, taking childbirth classes, and, of course, picking a name.

With so much going on, one very important decision often falls off the radar: finding the right pediatrician.

Reporter Michael Brindley and his wife have been busy making all these decisions, with the birth of their daughter last month.

Among the questions food producers and farmers are looking at these days is how they might be affected by a changing climate – and what they might do about it.

Police in Salem are investigating three drug overdoses in the city, less than a week after a similar series of overdoses in Portsmouth.

On Tuesday police in Salem found a man unconscious and not breathing. He was revived at a local hospital. They believe he is acquainted with a couple found in a similar state in a vehicle on Monday.

New Hampshire has seen a growing number of heroin deaths and overdoses in recent months.

Tai Viinikka, courtesy Flickr

We’ve been talking about energy a lot lately in New Hampshire – debates over wind farms, jet-fueled turbines generating power during peak demand, and, of course, Northern Pass.

There’s one energy project that hasn’t gotten much attention lately – a project in Peterborough that would create the largest solar power array in the state.

Authorities say heroin use in New Hampshire is growing at an alarming rate. Authorities say 61 people died of heroin overdoses in New Hampshire last year.

The issue has been of particular concern recently in Portsmouth, which saw three individuals overdose on heroin in the same week.

Seacoast Online reports 37 year old Simone Sclafani died Wednesday after being rushed to the hospital. Police have not commented on the conditions of the other two overdose victims.

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